Worldwide Guide to Women in Leadership
Heads of State of French Substates

Chronological list of the female heads of the substates and of the kingdom of France

See also France Ecclestiastical leaders, France Heads and France Substates

(THis list is not 100% up to date)


575-84 Regent Dowager Queen Brunhildis of Austrasia and Burgundy  
Also known as Brunhilde, the Visigothic Princess exerted great influence over political life in the Frankish kingdoms of Austrasia, Neustria, and Burgundy. She married King Sigebert of Austrasia in 567, while her sister Galswintha, married his brother Chilperic, king of Neustria. Rivalry between the brothers developed into open war when Chilperic had Galswintha murdered. When Sigebert was assassinated on the orders of Fredegunde - Chilperic's second wife - in 575, Chilperic claimed his lands. Brunhilde resisted this claim in the name of her son Childebert II. However, her nobles deserted her and she fled to Burgundy. Childebert remained in Austrasia and in 592 inherited Burgundy. When Childebert died in 595, Brunhilde attempted to assert her control as regent over Burgundy and Austrasia, which her grandsons Theodoric II and Theodebert II had inherited. In 612 Theodoric murdered his brother at her instigation. Theodoric himself died in 613. When Brunhilde tried to make her great-grandson Sigebert II king, the nobles rebelled and acknowledged Clotaire as king. In the autumn of 613, near Dijon, France, Clotaire had both Sigebert and Brunhilde executed.

584-94 Regent Dowager Queen Fredegundis of France
Fredgundis or Fredegunda was a slave-girl at the court of Neustria when she came to the attention of Chilperic I, Merovingian King of Soissons (Neustria). She became his mistress and then eventually third wife. She persuaded Chilperic to repudiate his first wife Audovera and was said to be the driving force behind the murder in 568 of Chilperic's second wife Galswintha. Fredegunda also engineered the murders of Audovera's three sons and Sigibert of Austrasia, Chilperic's brother. Finally her husband was murdered or assassinated, shortly after the birth of their son Lothair in 584. Fredegunda seized her late husband's wealth and fled to Paris with her remaining son Lothair (Clotaire II), and persuaded the Neustrian nobles to recognize her son as the legitimate heir to the throne and she took the role of Regent. In this capacity, she continued her longtime power struggle with Guntrum of Burgundy (d.593) and Brunhilda, Queen-Mother of Austrasia (d.614), whom she defeated around 597. Fredegunda (d. 598).

639-42 Regent Dowager Queen Nanthildis of Neustrasia and Burgundy  
A former servant she married the Merovingian king Dagobert I (604-29-35) after he had divorced his childless consort, Gomatrud. After Dagobert's death her son, Chlodwig II was appointed king of Neutrasia and Burgundy and his older half-brother, Sigibert III king of Austrasia. She received 1/3 of the royal treasure. She acted as regent together with the Major Domus Aega. As he attacked the Burgundfarons she protected them and 642 she reformed the office of Major Domus of Burgundy and appointed the Frankish Flaochad to the office. Also known as Nanthilde, Nanthechilde or Nantechildis, she lived (circa 610-642).
                 
657-64/65 Regent Dowager Queen Bathildis of Neustrie, Bourgogne and Austrasie  

Also known as Bathilde or Baldechildis, she was born in England, and taken to Gaul as a slave and about 641, she was bought by Erchinoald, mayor of the palace of Neustria. She married Clovis II in 648. The future Lothair III was born in 649, and she had two more sons, Theoderic and Childeric, who also eventually became rulers. Balthildis' influence during her husband's reign was considerable, since she controlled the court and the allocation of charity money, and had strong connections with Church leaders. After Clovis' death in 657 she became Regent for her son Lothair III and embarked on a policy of unifying the Frankish territory by controlling Austrasia through imposing her son Childeric as Prince and absorbing Burgundy. She lost her political power when Lothair came of age and was forced to retire to the Chapter of Chelles, which she had founded and endowed with much of her personal wealth in 664. She died in 680 in Chelles, and was later declared a saint.


662 Regent Dowager Queen Himnechilde of Austrasie  
Regent for Childéric II together with Major Domus (Major of the Palace) Wulfoald) Widow of Sigebert III.

664 Presiding Abbess Hilda of Whitby and Hartlepool of the Synod of Whitby (United Kingdom)
In 657, she had founded a double monastery of both monks and nuns at Whitby. She was a patroness of the arts and was a notable teacher, whose advice was sought by Kings and Abbots alike. At the Synod of Whitby it was decided that the Northombian Church it should follow the teachings of the Roman Church rather than those of Celtic Irish Iona. Hilda herself was, of course, sympathetic to the latter party, but she accepted the council's ruling. After her death, after a long and painful illness lasting some six years, miracles were soon reported at her tomb. She was venerated as a saint and her bones suitably enshrined.  St. Hilda was the daughter of Prince Hereric of Deira, and lived (614-680).

692 Regent Queen Dowager Clothilde of Neustrie and Bourgogne  
Regent for a few months for son Childéric. Also known as Rothilde, Chrothéchildis or Doda (d. 694/9).

714 Acting Major Domina Plectrude Theobaldo of Neustraia, Austria, Aquitania and Burgundy  
Also known as Plectrudis, she in a power-struggle with her stepson, Carles Martel after the death of her husband, Pipin II d'Heristal. She favoured the succession of one of her grandsons to the office of Major Domus. Her forces were finally defeated in 719. She inherited the lands between the Rhine, Moselle and Meuse after her mother Irmina, and was later declared a saint, (d. circa 725). 

Until 783 Politically Active Queen Berta of France
She was the wife of king Pepin and a mother of king Charles the Great, and was especially active in diplomacy.  

783-784 Politically Active Queen Fastrada of France
Involved in politics during the reign of her husband, king Charles the Great, until her death.

877-79 Presiding over the Court Queen Engelberge of the Franks
She played a prominent role during the reign of her husband, King Louis II of the Franks (846-77-79), who was succeeded by two of their sons, Louis III (863-79-82) and Carloman. Engelberge (d. 890). 

887-96 Regent Countess Dowager Ermengarde of Provence   
Widow of Louis II (822/4-75), who was king of Italy (844) and Holy Roman Emperor (850) and count of Provence (863-69). She was regent for son Louis III (887-928). He was king in Italy from 900 and Holy Roman Emperor from 901. Ermengarde (d. 896/96).

Around 920 Dame Ava of Auvergne  
Married to Geoffroy II de Gastinas, she lived (895-942).

923-934 Politically Influential Queen Emma of France
She was very Politically Active and a army leader during the reign of her husband king Rudolf. Daughter of king Robert I.

Until 942 Heiress Ermengarde II of Basse-Bourgogne    
The daughter of Richard le Justicier, Duke of Burgundy (952), she married her cousin married Gilbert de Chalon (circa 900-56), count d'Atun, Chalon, Beaune et Dijon in 938. Mother of two daughters who devided the inheritance. Liégarde became Duchesse de Bourgogne and Adélaide Countess d'Auxerre etc. in circa 956 Ermengarde lived (circa 905-42).

954-circa 59 Regent Dowager Queen Gerberga von Sachsen of France
In 939 her first husband, Duke Giselbert of Lorraine, died and she then married Louis IV of France, who also became ruler of Lorraine though with opposition from Hugo of Francien, who was married to her sister, Hadwig. In 954 her husband died, and she managed to secure the election of her son, Lothar III as king of France, and acted as his regent. The contemporary sources describe her as a highly educated, intelligent and forceful player in the political game of the time. Mother of around 10 children, she lived (913-69).

956-87 Sovereign Countess Adélaïde I Wéra de Chalon of Auxerre Chalons-sur-Saône and Beaune   
She was daughter of Gilbert de Chalon and Ermengarde II de Bourgogne. She first married to Robert I de Vermandois (circa 910-967) comte de Meaux, comte d'Auxerre et de Chalon and secondly Lambert de Chalon (ca.930-979) comte de Chalon et d'Autun (circa 945). Her sister, Liégarde inherited Bourgogne. Adélaide Wéra lived (circa 928-89).

Around 956 Hereditary Duchess Liégarde de Vergy of Bourgogne   
She was daughter of Gilbert de Chalon and Ermengarde II de Bourgogne. She was daughter of Ermengarde and her husband, Eudes of France. They did not have any children. Her sister, Adélaide inherited Auxerre and Chalons.

978-87 Regent Dowager Duchess Beatrx von Franzien of Upper Lorraine
Not very politically active during the reign of her husband, Friederich, but after his death she took over the regency for her son, Dietrich I as "Dux" of Lotharingia. After the death of Otto II she supported the Empresses Adelheid and Theophano and the candidature of the minor Otto III against other candidates and as reward her younger son, Adalberto vas first named Bishop of Verdun and the of Metz. 985 she participated in the "Colloquium dominarum" in Metz together with Queen Emma of France, the German Empresses and her sister-in-law, Adelheid, the wife of Hugo Capets, and Heinrich dem Zänker, which settled the dispute conserning Lorraine. From teil. Die Zusammenkunft bezweckte einen Ausgleich der Spannungen und Auseinandersetzungen in und um Lothringen. For the rest of her time in office, she was very engaged in diplomatic activites with France and the Empire.


986-87 Regent Dowager Queen Emma of France
Daughter of Lothaire III of Italy and Germany, who died in 950. Her mother Adélaide later married Otto I of Germany. Emma became regent after the death of her husband King Lothaire for son Louis V, who was king from 26th of march till 18th May.

987-96 Joint Ruler Queen Alais d'Aquitaine of France
Also known as Adèle, she was married to Hugues Capet, and reigned jointly with him, and after his death 996 she also seems to have played a political role during the beginning of the reign of her son, Robert II. She was daughter of Guillaume II and Adèle de Normandie, and lived (circa 945-1004/06).

Ca 1000 Sovereign Countess Eve of Dreux and Dauphine   
Succeeded father Landri and reigned jointly with her husband, Gauthier de Vexin.

1010-? Sovereign Countess Melisende of Dunois   
Daughter of Geoffoi II and married to Warin de Domfront of Alençon.

1010-? Sovereign Countess Melisende of Dunois   
Daughter of Geoffoi II and married to Warin de Domfront of Alençon.

1031-79 Sovereign Countess Adélaïde de France of Auxerre   
Daughter of King Robert II (972-1031). Married to Renaud I de Nevers, and succeeded by sister, Adele. She lived (1003-79).

1033 Sovereign Countess Alix of Rouci   
Also known as Adeleaide, Alice or Isabelle, the county is also known as Roucy. She married Hildouin III de Montdidier and lived (circa 1014-63).

1033-93 Sovereign Countess Sophie of Bar   
Succeeded father of Henri I who was both Duke of Lorraine and Count of Bar. She reigned jointly with husband Louis de Mousson, Count de Montbéliard until his death in 1065 or 1170. Succeeded by son, Thierry II. 

1039-44 Regent Dowager Duchess Agnes de la Bourgogne of Aquitanie and Poitou   
She became the third wife of Guillaume III-V, Duke of Aquitaine, one of the most powerful lords in France. After about twelve years of marriage, Guillaume died and Agnes defeated his two sons from a previous marriage. First she ruled by herself, then later with her own two sons. She married again but her second husband, the Count of Anjou, divorced her after eighteen years.  She lived (995-1068).

1040-57 Regent Dowager Duchess Berthe I of Bretagne   
The widow of Alain III she was regent for her son Conan II (1040-40-66),

Around 1043 Sovereign Countess Mantsrede I of Joigny   
Apparently also known as Alix, she was married to Etienne I, Sire de Vaux before 1045, who lived (1020-48). Mantsrede was born before 1020.

Before 1047 Sovereign Countess Adelaide I of Soissons  
Daughter of Renaud I and married to Guillaume II comte d'Eu. Succeeded by son.

1055-61 Hereditary Duchess Agnes de Pointou of Bavaria  (Germany)
1056-62 Regent Dowager Empress of the Holy Roman Empire
She was descended from the royal houses of Burgundy and Italy, the daughter of William V of Aquitaine and Poitou, she became the second wife of the German king Henry III in 1043. They were crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Empress by Clement II in 1046. After her husband's death she acted as Regent for her son, Heinrich IV (1050-?) She was not an experienced politician and was influenced by the nobility to part with the duchies of Bavaria and Carinthia, and entered into unwise alliances against the dominant reforming party in the Papacy. By 1062 discontent led to an uprising in which Anno, Archbishop of Köln, took over the regency. Agnes retired to a convent where she remained until her death. She lived (1024-77).

1057-99 Sovereign Countess Adelaide II of Soissons   
Daughter of Rainald I and married Guillaume Busac, Comte de Hiesmes. She lived (1034-99).

1060-? Regent Queen Anne de Kiev of France
After the death of her husband, Henri I, she was joint regent for her son, Philippe I, together with Baudouin V of Flanders. Her marriage to Raoul, Comte de Valois caused a scandal, since he was already married. He was excommunicated, and she died in a convent. She was daughter of Jarosla Vladimirovich of Kiev and Indegard of Norway, and lived (1051-89).

1067-70 Sovereign Countess Ermengard of Carcasconne  
She was the daughter of Roger II, succeeded her brother, Roger III and was married to Raimond Bernard, Vicomte d'Alby.

1066-69 and 1069-83 Regent Queen Mathilda of Flanders of England of Normandie   
She was married to William I the Conqueror of England (1066-87) and duke of Normandy. He depended heavily on her and she acted as regent whenever he was absent after their marriage in 1051. With him in England 1067-69 until she went back to Normandy, where she remained in charge until her death. In 1077 the oldest son, Robert Curthose, suggested that he should become the ruler of Normandy and Maine. When William the Conqueror refused, Robert rebelled and attempted to seize Rouen. The rebellion failed and Robert was forced to flee and established himself at Gerberoi. William besieged him there in 1080 but Matilda managed to persuade the two men to end their feud. Mother of around 10 children, one of the last being king Henry I. She lived (circa 1031-83).

1070-1111 Hereditary Countess Ide d'Artois of Boullion   
She was daughter of Godefroi de Lorraine and his first wife, Doda. Married to Count Eustrache II of Boulogne (d. circa 1080), and their second son, Godefroi IV was co-count. Her third son was King Badouin I of Jerusalem. She lived (1040-1113).

1070-82 Sovereign Dame Mabile of Alençon   
Succeeded father Yves II and reigned jointly with husband Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Arundel and Shrewsbury (1070-94). 

1075-80 Sovereign Countess Adelaide II of Chalons-sur-Saône and Beaune   
Married to Guy II de Thiers.

1079 Sovereign Countess Adele de France of Auxerre   
Succeeded sister of Adélaïde. Married Richard III de Normandie and Baudoin V de Flanders. She lived (1009-79). 

1079-81 Countess Adeline of Meulent   
Also known as Adeliza, she was daughter of Waleran de Beaumont, who lived (990-1069). Her husband, Roger de Beaumont, was President of the Council, appointed by William the Conqueror to assist his wife in the government of Normandy. He was related to the Danish rulers of Normandy and the kings of Denmark. She lived (1014-81).

1080-1123 Sovereign Countess Adelaïde of Vermandois  
1080-1118 Sovereign Countess of Crépy-en-Valois
Daughter of Count Herbert de Vermandois, who succeeded his father-in-law in 1076. She inherited Crépy-en-Valois via her mother, Adéle de Valois, and reigned jointly with husband Hugues de France until his death in 1102. She was succeeded by son, Raoul IV. 

1080-96 Sovereign Countess Beatrix I of Bigorre   
Succeeded brother Raymond II and reigned jointly with husband, Cenule I (Vicount Centule IV de Béarn) until his death in 1088. Succeeded by son Bernard III. 

1085-1102 Sovereign Countess Euphrosine of Vendôme  
1102-05 Regent Dowager Countess
She succeeded her brother, Bouchard III, and was married to Geoffroi Jourdain, Lord de Previlly, and was succeeded by Geoffroi Grisegonella de Bourbon, and initially acted as his regent.

1090/93-1100 Sovereign Countess Etiennette of Provence  
Also known as Douce or Dulcia.

1091-1116 Sovereign Countess Almodis of La Marche   
She succeeded father Boson II and reigned jointly with husband, Roger de Montgomery (d. 1123). Succeeded by son Boson III.

1100-1112 Sovereign Countess Gerberga of Provence  
She succeeded Etiennette, who ruled from 1093 and was succeeded by Dolca/Dulcia I who married Raymond Berenguer III of Barcelona.

1100-circa 14 Regent Duchess Mathilde-Philippa de Toulouse of Aquitaine and Poitou  
1114-17 Claimant of Toulouse
Her husband, Guillaume (Duke and Count 1086-1127), went to the Holy Land after the first crusade had finished in 1099 and took part in the creation of the Kingdom of Jerusalem and some of the other Latin Principalities. She acted as regent during his absence. She claimed the county from her cousin, and attacked the county. Her husband concquered and lost the county two times, they probably seperated in 1115 and she died as a nun. She was daughter of Guillaume IV de Toulouse (1040/45-60-93) and first married to Sancho I of Aragon, who was killed in 1094. Mother of two sons, and lived (1068-1117).

1100-... Sovereign Countess Agnes of Ponthieu   
She succeeded father, Gui I and reigned jointly with husband Roger II de Ralvas, Count d'Alençon. 

11... Politically Influential Countess Gertruda of Guines  
She was a Welsh revolutionary who raised an army to rebel against the oppressive regime of King John. She was captured on the battlefield and died as his prisoner.

1105-08 Regent Dowager Countess Elvira de Castilla of Tripoli (Lebanon)  
1108-circa 23 Regent of Toulouse   
After the death of her husband Raimond IV de  Saint-Gilles of Toulouse, she became regent for their infant son, Alphonse Jordan (b. 1105), but the situation was difficult and she desided to move to Toulouse and transferred Tripoli to her husband's illegitimate son, Bertrand, who left for the Holy Land to claim his inheritance. She lived (circa 1080-after 1151).

1107-09 Sovereign Countess Ide-Raymonde of Lyonnais and Forez   
Her brother, Guillaume III was count (1079-97) and was succeeded by a number of male relatives. Widow of Guy-Raymond d'Albon, count Forez.

1110-circa 26 Sovereign Countess Eremburge of Maine   
She succeeded her father, Helie de la Fleche, Count of Maine by-the-right of his wife, Paula de Maine, and co-reigned with husband Foulques d'Anjou who died in 1142. Her daughter, Mathilde, was given the county of Maine upon her marriage to William of Wales, who died 1120, and when Mathilde entered a convent, her son, Helie, became Count of Maine. Eremburge lived (circa 1090-circa 1126).

1112-30 Sovereign Countess Dulcia I of Provence  
Successor of Countess Gerberga, she was married to count Ramon Berenguer III of Barcelona (1086-1131) and succeeded by son, Raymond Berenguer IV and II the Saint of Barcelona and Provence.

Circa 1121-50 Sovereign Countess Tiburge I of Orange   
Succeeded father Raimbaud II and reigned together with husband, Guillaume I d'Omélas (d. 1156). In 1150 they were succeeded by their son Raimbaud III.

Circa 1125-35/51 Sovereign Countess Mahaut I of Boulonge   
Also known as Queen Matilda of England, she succeeded father Eustache III, and reigned jointly with her husband, King Stephen de Blois of England (d. 1154) and succeeded by first two sons Eustache IV, William, Earl of Warenne and Surrey and then by daughter, Marie in 1159.

1127-36 Sovereign Countess Beatrix II of Bigorre   
Succeeded father, Centule II and joint ruler with husband Pierre I de Marsan, who was succeeded by their son Centule III in 1163. 

1128-.. Regent Isabella of Amboise  
After the death of her husband, Hugo, she was regent for her son Sulpisius. She died after 1143.

1132-72 Sovereign Countess Beatrix of Maguelone de Susbstancion et de Melgueil   
Malegone was a county on the Lancedoc coast of Bretagne. It was a pontific fief under the sovereignty of the Pope in Avignon.

1135-50 De-facto Sovereign Duchess Mathilda of Normandie  
1141-47/52 Sovereign Lady Domina of England 
1141 Queen Regnant (2/2-September) [8th of April-1st of November]
Matilda or Maud was the only daughter of Henry I of England by Queen Matilda. In 1114, she married the Holy Roman emperor Henry V, who died in 1125, and secondly with Geoffrey of Anjou 1128. She was the only legitimate of her father, Henry I's around 20 children, 1127 the estates paid homage to her as her father's successor and her cousin, Stephen de Blois, swore an oath recognizing her as heir, but broke it after Henry's death, and in her absence he usurped the title. She claimed the throne of England in 1139 and deposed King Stephen in April 1141. Elected "Lady of the English" by a clerical council at Winchester in April, she entered London in June; but her arrogance and tactless demands for money provoked the citizens to chase her away to Oxford before she could be crowned Queen. Her forces were routed at Winchester in September 1141, and thereafter she maintained a steadily weakening resistance in the west country. Left England in 1148 and returned to Normandy, where she was Duchess Regnant (1135-67). Her son, Henri d'Anjou, became King Henry II. She lived (1102-67).

1137-1204 Sovereign Duchess Eleanore de Poitiers of Aquitanie et Pouitou, Guenne et Gascongne  
1155, 1158 1160, 1189-91, 1192 and 1199 Regent of England 
1165-66 Regent of Normandie
The daughter and heiress of William X, duke of Aquitaine, she married Louis IV of France in 1137 shortly before his accession to the throne. She accompanied him on the Second Crusade (1147–49). Eleanor bore Louis two daughters, but in 1152 their marriage was annulled. Soon afterward Eleanor married the 11 year younger Henry, duke of Normandy and count of Anjou, uniting her vast possessions with those of her husband. Louis VII feared this powerful combination, and when Henry ascended the English throne in 1154, the stage was set for a long struggle between the English and French kings. Eleanor bore Henry three daughters and five sons. Because of Henry's infidelities, especially his relationship with Rosamond, Eleanor's relations with her husband grew strained, and in 1170 she established a court of her own at Poitiers. She supported her sons in their unsuccessful revolt against Henry in 1173 and was held in confinement by Henry until 1185. Her efforts helped Richard secure the throne in 1189. While Richard was on the Third Crusade and later held captive in Europe (1190–94), Eleanor was active in forestalling the plots against him by his brother John and in collecting the ransom for his release. She brought about a reconciliation between the two brothers, and on Richard's death in 1199 she supported John's claims to the throne over those of Arthur I of Brittany. Eleanor's court at Poitiers was the scene of much artistic activity and was noted for its cultivation of courtly manners and the concept of courtly love. The first three times she was regent during her husband's stay in his French possessions. She was also regent for mother-in-law, Empress Mathilde, in Normandy, regent during Richard IIs crusades and after his death regent until her younger son, Count John d'Anjou came to England to take over the throne. She lived (1122-1204).

1138-39 and 1147-49 Regent Countess Sibylla d'Anjou of Flanders (Belgium)
She was regent during her husband, Diedrik's participation in the crusades She fought off attacks by Badouin of Hainault, an old arch-enemy of her husband. In 1157 she moved to Jerusalem with her husband and stayed there the rest of her life and remained very influential within the royal family. She joined the Convent of Bethani. The was daughter of Count Fulco V of Anjou-Jerusalem and mother of six children, including Margaretha, who inherited Flanders from her brother in 1191. Sibylla lived (circa 1110-65).

1143-92 Sovereign Countess Ermengarde of Narbonne   
Daughter of Aymérie II (1105-34), who was succeeded by her brother, Alfonse Jourdain, Count of Toulouse. She was the leader of the French royalist party in the south of the country, which was in opposition to the English. She fought numerous wars defending her domain and was a patron of troubadours and protector of the church. Also a renowned arbiter and judge in complex cases of feudal law. She was married to Alphonse 1143-1145 and Bernard II d'Anduse from 1145, but none of the husbands had any part in the government. Ermengarde resigned in favour of her nephew Pierre II de Lara. She (d. 1197). 

1148-58 Regent Dowager Duchess Berthe II of Bretagne, Rennes, Vannes, Dol, Poher, Cornovalles and Nantes  
Daughter of Conan III who was succeeded by her son, Conan IV le Petit (1140-48-69-71) and joint regent with her husband, Eudes II of Rohan and Porhoët.

1148-84 Sovereign Countess Beatrix I of Upper Bourgogne and Franche-Comté  
Succeeded father, Reinald III of Burgundy, and married Friedrich I Barbarossa, who became Emperor in 1155. She was succeeded by son Otto I, and lived (1140-84).

1154-65 Co-Reigning Countess Consort Constance of France of Toulouse  
Her first husband, Count Eustache IV.of Boulogne, Duke of Normandie and Heir to the English Throne died in 1153 and the following year she married Raimondo V of Toulouse. She was the first Countess of Toulouse to use the title of Duke, she often signed official documents with the title Regina or Dux Narbonnæ, but at her seal she used the title Ducissa. The couple was divorced 1165. She was daughter of king Louis VI in his second marriage to Adelaide de Savoie, the mother of four children, and lived (circa 1124-circa 80).

1156 Sovereign Dame Mathilde-Mahaut de Bourgogne of Montpensier and Comtesse de Grigon   
Daughter of Dame Agnès de Thiern (around 1140), and lived (1150-1192).

1159-70 Sovereign Countess Marie of England of Boulonge   
Daughter of Mahaut I (Queen Matilda of England) and king Stephen de Blois of England. She succeeded brother and was joint ruler with husband, Mathieu d'Alsace (Flanders) until their divorce in 1170. After his death in 1173 he was succeeded by their daughter Ide. Marie's sister, Mathilde (ca.1159-1211), inherited the lands and possessions in England. Marie lived (circa 1136-80/81).

1160-80 Sovereign Countess Tiburge II of Orange   
Succeeded father Guillaume II and was succeeded by great-aunt, Tiburge III who had been joint ruler since 1173.

1160-97 Sovereign Countess Marguerite de France of Véxin  
Daughter of King Louis VII of France and first married Henri Court-Martel, Prince of England, Duke of Normandie (d. 1183) - the son her father's ex-wife Leonore of Aquitaine, and secondly with King Béla III of Hungary. She lived (1155-97). 

1162-1228 Sovereign Countess Beatrix of Grenoble and Albon, Dauphine Viennois  
At the age of one, she succeeded father Guigues V and from circa 1179 she reigned jointly with husbands Albéric Taillefer, Count de Saint Gilles, from 1183 with Duke Hugues III de Bourgogne, who died 1192 and the following with Hugues de Coligny-Revermont (d. 1205), and succeeded by son André Guigues VI, who took over as Dauphin of  Viennois and Count d'Albon around 1202. Mother of three children, and lived (1162-1228).

1162-79 Regent Dowager Countess Beatrix di Montferrato of Grenoble, d'Albon and Viennois  
Regent for daughter, Beatrix, who succeeded to the county at the age of one. Beatrix di Montferrato lived (circa 1142-1228).

1162-63 Regent Marguerite of Viennois and Dauphiné  
Regent for niece for one year, until her own death. 

1164/67-82/83 Sovereign Countess Isabelle-Mabile of Valois and Vermandois   
Succeeded her father Raoul I and married Philippe de Lorraine, Count of Flanders. They had no children and the country reverted to the French crown. She lived (1143-83).

1166-67 Sovereign Countess Dulcia II of Provence and Melgueil, Vicomtesse de Gevaudan and Rodez  
She succeeded Raymond Berenguer III of Provence. In the period 1162-1196 her cousin, King Alfonso II of Aragón, occupied Barcelona and from 1167 also Provence. She was engaged to Raimond VI de Toulouse, and lived (circa 1165-1172).

1166-67 Regent Dowager Countess Richsa of Poland of Provence   
She was in charge of the government during her infant daughter's brief reign. Richsa was daughter of Duke WLadyslaw II. of Poland, of Krakow and Schlesia, and Agnes of Austria and first married to king Alphonso VII of Castilla-Leon and mother of two children by him, who both predeceased their father. After his death in 1157 she went to the court of Raimondo Berenger IV's court in Barcelona, whose son, Alphonso II of Aragon had been engaged to her daughter. In 1161 she married Raymond Berenguer III of Provence and after his death in five years later, she married Count Albrecht II. von Everstein (d. 1197), an ally of her mother's cousin Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa. She lived (1130/40-1185).

1167 Sovereign Countess Isabelle of Vermandois and Valois
1167-83 Countess of Crépy  
Also known as Mabile, she was Daughter of Raoul II and Countess Marguerite de Flandre, and was married to Philippe d'Alsace, Count of Flanders (d. 1191), and lived (1143-83). 

1167-1214  Sovereign Countess Éleonore of Vermandois, Valois et Saint-Quentin  
Sister of Isabelle or Mabile and Married to Godefroy de Hainaut , Comte d'Ostervant (d. 1163) and Guillaume IV, Comte de Nevers, she renounced her titles inf favour of the Crown of France. She lived  (1152-circa 1222).

1170-1201 Sovereign Dame Arnalda de Caboët of Andorra
Her father, Arnau de Caboet, had been given the Valley of Andorra as a fief by the Bishop of Urgell. Her mother, Sancha de Castellbò was daughter of Pierre Raymond, Viscount de Higher Urgell and Vicomtesse Sibylle de Cerdagne. Arnalda married Viscount Arnau de Castellbò-Cerdagne (1155-1226), and they were succeeded by daughter, VicountessErmessenda de Castellbò i Carboet, who married Roger Bernard II of Foix in 1208, and Andorra was inherited by the houses of Foix, Bearn and Navarra. Arnalda lived (1164-1201).

1170-73 Sovereign Viscounts Marie of Bearn and d'Oloron, Brulhois and Gabarret and Countess of Bigorre  
Succeeded brother, Gaston V and reigned together with husband, Guillaume I de Moncarde and was succeeded by son Gaston VI le Bon (1173-1215).

Around 1170 Co-Ruler Countess Emma of Guines  
Together with husband, Baldwin I, Count of Manasse.

1171-87/1201 Sovereign Duchess Constance of Bretagne   
Succeeded father Conan IV. Her first husband was the son of King Henry of England and Duchess Regnant Leonore of Aquitaine, Geoffrey II Plantagenet was duke 1181-86 (†). Their daughter, Eleanor was Maid of Bretagne but became Countess in her own right of Richmond (1185-1208-41). Constance's second husband was Ranulph de Blundeville, 4th Earl of Chester. They divorced in 1199, and she then married Guy Viscount de Thouras with whom she had the daughter Alice de Thuars. Constance lived (1161-1201).

From 1171 Possible Regent Dowager Duchess Margaret of Huntingdon of Bretagne  
Countess of Herford (or Herefort) in her own right, she possibly acted as regent for daughter Constance who was underage.. 

1171-1218 Sovereign Countess Mahaut I of Bourbon  
Succeeded father Archambaud VIII and reigned jointly with husband Gui II de Dampierre 1200-15. Succeeded by son Archambaud IX. 

1173-1214 Sovereign Countess Ide of Boulonge   
Ide's mother, Marie de Blois, was Countess of Boulonge until her divorce from Mathieu d'Alsace in 1170. He continued to reign as count until his death in 1173. Ide married Mathieu II with Philippe d'Alsace as regent. Matheiu II died in 1180 and she married Count Gerhard III van Gelders, Duke Berthold IV von Zähringen (or possibly Berthold V) and finally Count Rainald I. von Dammartin-en-Goelo, who were all joint regents. Ide's sister, Mathilde, inherited the estates in England that their mother had inherited from her father, King Stephen. Ide was succeeded by daughter, Countess Mahaut II (Mathilde) de Dammartin et Boulonge in 1214, and lived (1161-1214/16).

1173-82 Sovereign Countess Tiburge III of Orange   
The daughter of Tiburge I, she reigned jointly with Tiburge II until, the granddaughter of her brother Raimbaud III

1175-81 Regent Dowager Countess Mahaut de Bourgogne of Auxerre, Nevers and Tonnerre  
1170 she married Count Guy, who was involved in various wars - first he accompanied King Louis VII of France during his campaign against Baron Geoffroy IV de Donzy and in 1174 he was involved in a fight against Duke Hugues II of Bourgogne because she - and her mother-in-law - had advised him not to pay homage to the Duke for the possessions he held in Bourgogne. He lost the fight, was taken prisoner but was freed after she paid his ransom, but died soon after, making her regent for her son, Guillaume V, who died as a child and was succeeded by sister, Agnès, after her uncle, Renaud, had renounced his rights in her favour.

1178-90 Sovereign Countess Beatrix III Stephanie of Bigorre  
Succeeded father, Centule III and reigned jointly with husbands Pierre II de Dax and Bernard IV de Comminges, who died in 1226. She was succeeded by daughter, Petronille.

1180-90 Sovereign Dame Isabelle de Hainault of Artois (France/Belgium)
Daughter of Baudouin V-VIII of Flanders and Hainault and Margareta of Flanders. She was married to king Philippe II August of France, and her son, Louis, was created Count d'Artois. She died after having given birth stillborn twins, and lived (1170-90). After her death her husband first married Ingeborg of Denmark, but their marriage broke down in 1200 and he then married Agnès de Méranie, but also this marriage was repudiated.

1180-96 Sovereign Countess Havoise of Aumale    
Succeeded father Guillaume I and reigned jointly with three husbands; William de Mandeville, Earl of Essex until 1189, Geoffroi des Forts until 1191, and Baudouin de Choques until 1196.After her death, the French king reigned the county until 1200.

1180-1208 Sovereign Countess Mahaut of La Marche and Angoulême   
Also known as Mathilde, she fist succeeded a relative, Aldebert V, in La Marche. In Angouleme, she succeeded father, Vougrin II Taillefer, who had been deposed by king Richard of England in 1179. Her two brothers succeeded each others as pretenders to the county and she was succeeded by niece, Isabella, who claimed the title after her father's death in 1202. In La Marche Mahaut reigned jointly with her husband Hugues de Luisignan (d. 1206).

1181-92 Sovereign Countess Agnès of Auxerre, Tonnerre and Nevers, Dame de Donzy    
The daughter of Count Guy I. de Nevers-Auxerre-Tonnerre (d.1175) and Mahaut/Mathilde de Bourgogne-Grignon, she succeeded her brother Guillaume V, and became the first of a succession of female rulers, which lasted for more than a century. She spend three years at the court of the king of France, who married her to the grandson of King Louis VI of France, Pierre II de Courtenay, Emperor of Constantinople (1216-19), and succeeded by her only daughter Mathilde, who was head of all three counties (1195-1257). Agnes lived (circa 1170-92).

1183-1214 Sovereign Countess Eléonore de Valois  
Succeeded sister, Maile or Isabelle de Vermandois and Valois, but her brother-in-law Philippe refused to give up the county, but he was defeated by King Philippe Auguste de France. Eléonore reigned jointly with husband, Mathieu, Count de Beaument-sur-Oise. Her younger sister was heiress to the county, but it was occupied by France 1214-40. 

1186-1227 Sovereign Countess Alix of Eu   
Succeeded brother, Raoul I and reigned jointly with husband Raoul II de Lusignan-Issoudun and was succeeded by son Raoul III.

1190-91 Regent Dowager Queen Alix de Blois-Champagne of France
The third wife of Louis VII, she acted as regent during her son, Philippe II August's participation in the crusades at the time. She lived (1140-1206).

1190-1251 Sovereign Countess Petronille of Bigorre  
Succeeded mother Beatrix III Stephanie, and reigned jointly with her husbands Gaston VI de Bearn, Gui de Montfort, Aymar de Rançon and Boson de Mastas. She was succeeded first by grandson and then by granddaughter, Constance in 1283.

1191-98 Sovereign Countess Catherine of Clermont  
Daughter of Raoul I Count of Clermont en Beauvoisis (1130-91) and married to Louis de Blois, Count of Chartres (1166-1205), and succeeded by son, Thibault. She was born before 1176.

1199-1257 Sovereign Countess Mahaut I de Courtenay of Nevers
1204-04, 1214 and 1218-19 Sole Regent of Nevers
1219-57 Sovereign Countess of Auxerre and Tonnerre, Dame de Courtenay   
Her mother Agnès died 1192 and her father, Pierre de Courtenay, Count de Namur 1212 and Emperor of Constantinople 1217, kept control of the three counties until 1299 when he transferred the County of Nevers to Baron Hervé V de Donzy, as part of a ransom for his freedom as he had been taken prisoner during a armed conflict between the two. The following year Mahaut was married to Hervé. Pierre kept control over Auxerre and Tonnerre until his death in 1219. 1204-04 and 1214 Hervé accompanied King Philippe on warfares against the English, 1218-19 on the Fifth Crusade and she was left in sole control of the counties. Her husband died three years later imprisoned in his chateau of Saint-Aignan. In 1223 Mahaut signed the Municipal Charter of Auxerre. Her daughter Agnès de Donzy died in 1225, the following year Mahaut married Guy de Forez and raised her grandchildren Gaucher and Yolande de Châtillon. Mahaut was succeeded by her great-granddaughter, Mahaut II de Dampierre - daughter of her granddaughter Yolande de Châtillon and Archambaud de Dampierre, and lived (1188-1257).

1194-1203 (†) Regent Countess Adelaide de Toulouse of Carasconne  
For Raymond Roger, who died 1209. 

1194-1228 Queen Regnant Blanca I of Navarra, Sovereign Countess of Champagne. (Spain and France)
She was daughter of Sancho VI and Sancha Beatriz de Castilla, and was succeeded by her son, Teobaldo I and was married to Teobaldo of Champagne and later by her daughter, Blanca II. Blanca I lived (1177-1229).


1197-1213 Sovereign Countess Marie de Montpellier  
Married to Pedro III de Aragón. They engaged in a power struggle about the control of her country.

1197-after 1200 Sovereign Countess Alix de France of Véxin  
Succeeded her sister, Margurerite, who was given the conty as a dowry in 1160. She was first engaged to the heir to the English throne, Richard, also son of her father's ex-wife Leonore of Aquitaine, but instead married Guillaume II, Count de Ponthieu and Montreuil. She had no children, and lived (ca 1160-after 1200). 

From 1199 Sovereign Countess Blance d'Éureay  
The county is situated in Normandy.

1200-05 Sovereign Countess Palatine Jeanne of Bourgogne  
She was daughter of Otton I et de Marguerite de Champagne, Comtesse Palatine de Bourgogne (1200-1205) and succeeded by sister Beatix II (1192-1231). She lived (1191-1205).

1200-31 Sovereign Countess Beatrix II of Franche-Comté  
1205-31 Countess Palatine de Bourgogne 
Succeeded father, Otto I in Franche-Comté and sister in Bourgogne, and reigned jointly with husband Duke Otto II de Meran (1208-34), who was succeeded by their son, Otto III de Meran and Franche-Comté. She lived (1192-1231).

1201 Pretender Philippine de Champagne-Jerusalem of Champagne  
She was the younger daughter of Henri de Champagne and Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem, she claimed the county of Champagne after the death of her cousin, Thibaut, jointly with her older sister, Queen Alice of Jerusalem, and the fights over the inheritance lasted about a quarter of a century. Some of the nobles and prelates supported Philippa and her sister, others supported Queen Blanca of Castilla and her son. In 1221 both sisters seceded their claims in exchange of a large payment. But in 1227 they made a new attempt and new fights erupted. But in 1234 the inheritance was finally settled, the sisters were granted a large sum of money and Alice had the treaty confirmed by her son, Henri of Cyprus and her daughters Maria and Isabella. Philippa was married to Sire Erard III de Brienne, mother of seven children, and lived (circa 1195- 1250).

1202-circa 44 Sovereign Countess Isabelle Taillefer of Angoulême  
She was daughter of Adémer III Taillefer, who was pretender to the county (1181-1202) against his sister, Countess Mahaut. After his death she claimed the title, 6 years before Mahaut died. First married to King John without Land of England 1216, when he died when she was visiting Queen Blance in Paris, after having returned to England she gave birth to a daughter. After the coronation of her 8 year old son, Henry, she was asked by the Barons to leave England and she returned to her own lands. Here she arranged for her daughter to marry Hugues X de Lusignan, Count de La Marche, to whom she was engaged before her marriage to John, but married him herself in 1218. She was very powerful in both counties thoug her husband was titular co-ruler. He and her son, Henry III, were engaged in fights against the French king in 1242. The following year she devided her possessions among those of her 13 children who had survived infancy, and joined the convent of Fontrevault. After her death her husband joined one of the crucades and died in the Holy Land in 1249. She lived (1186-1246).

1202-after 05 Regent Countess Alice of Angoulême  
Widow of the pretender, Adémer Taillefer to the county, she was regent for daughter, Isabelle. 

1203-21 Sovereign Countess Alix de Bretagne  
1221-37 Regent
She succeeded the older son of her mother, Constance, and her first husband, Arthur I. Her husband, Pierre I was count 1213-21. He was also count of Penthièvre and Richmond. Their son, Jean I the Read succeeded as count when his father died, with her as regent. She died 1250.

1203-28 Sovereign Countess Beatrice de Thiers of Chalons-sur-Saône and Beaune   
Succeeded father Guillaume VI and Married Etienne III de Bourgogne (1170-1240). After her death in 1228, the county was inherited by son, Jean I (1190-1266).

1205-44 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Constantinople of Flanders Hainault and Namur (Belgium and France)
She was the oldest daughter of Boudewijn IX. In 1212 she married to Ferrand of Portugal. As he refused to support king Philippe II of France during an attack on England, the latter attacked Flanders. Ferrand lost the battle and was taken prisoner in 1214. In 1226 Johanna negotiated the Peace of Melun. In 1333 Ferrand died, and Johanna remarried in 1237 to Thomas of Savoie. She had no children and was succeeded by sister, Marguerite II.

1205-12 Sovereign Countess Elisabeth de Luxembourg of Saint-Pôl  
She was daughter of Hugues IV Camp d'Avesnes (d. 1205), and married Gaucher III, seigneur de Châtillon, de Troissy, de Montjay, de Crécy and de Pierrefons (d. 1219). Succeeded by son, Gui I, who married Agnès, Countess of Nevers and Auxerre. She lived (1179-1263).

1207-57 Sovereign Countess Mahaut I de Courtenay of Nevers, d'Auxerre and Tonnerre  
Daughter of Comtesse Agnès and Pierre de Courtenay Count of Namur 1212, Emperor of Constantinople 1217, she married Hervé IV de Donzy, Seigneur de Donzy and Guy IV, Count de Forez. 

1209-19 Regent Dowager Countess Garsende de Sabran of Provence  
She was regent for Ramón Berenguer IV together with King Pedro of Aragón (1209-13), Count Sancho de Bouillon (1213-16) and Nuño Sánchez (1213-121..).  

1214-circa 60 Sovereign Countess Mahaut II of Dammartin and Boulogne   
Also known as Mathilde, she succeeded mother, Countess Ide, who ruled (1173-1214). Her mother was daughter of Countess Marie (1159-69) who again was daughter of Countess Mahaut I (circa 1125-51). Mahaut was married to Count Philippe Hurepel de Clermont-en-Beauvais, Mortain, Aumale, Dammartin et Boulogne (the latter by the right of his wife) (son of King Philippe II Augusta of France) and in 1238 to King Alfonso III of Portugal (1210-79). She was succeeded by daughter, Jeanne, and lived (1190/95-circa 1260).

1215-42 Sovereign Dame Mahaut I of Bourbon   
She was the heir of Archambaud V (1116-71), and first married Gautier de Vienne, who ruled Bourbon (1171-1215). She married Gui II de Dampierre and had two daughters, Mahaut II de Dampierre and Agnes. She was succeeded by Archambaud VII upon her death in 1242.

1218-30 Sovereign Countess Marguerite de Champagne-Blois of Blois and Châteaudun     
Together with sister, she succeeded the son of their brother, Thibaut VI, Her first husband, Hugo III, Seigneur d'Oisy, Vicomte von Cambrai died in 1189, and three years later she married Otto I. von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf von Burgundy (1166/73-1200). Two years after his death she married Walter II d'Avesnes, Seigneur de Guise et Conde (d. 1243/46). She was succeeded by daughter Marie d'Avesnes Countess de Blois, Dame d'Avesmes and de Guise (circa 1203-30-41). Marguerite lived (1164-1230).

1218-48 Sovereign Countess Isabelle de Champagne-Blois of Chartres and Romorantin     
Succeeded her nephew together with her sister, Marguerite. She was first married to Sulpice d'Amboise and secondly to Jean de Montmirail, Vicomte  Cambrai. (d. 1248).

1218-23 Sovereign Countess Petronille of Bar-sur-Seine     
Her father, Milon II, count of Bar-sur-Seine, died in 1191, She was his only child, and was married to Hugues du Puiset, Vicomte de Chartres.

1218 Regent Duchess Alice de Vergy of Bourgogne  
The widow of Eudes III she was regent for Hugues VI, Duke of Burgundy, Count of Chalon, Titular King of Thessalonica etc. Eudes III was first married to Countess Teresa of Portugal (1157-1218) until their divorce in 1195). Eudes and Alice had four children. 

1219-20 Sovereign Countess Alice of Alençon  
Succeeded Robert IV and in the period 1220-68 the county was ruled by the kings of France. 

1221-51 Sovereign Countess Marie of Ponthieu  
Succeeded father Guillaume III and reigned jointly with Count Simon de Dammartin d'Aumale and Mathieu de Montorenci until his death in 1250. Succeeded by daughter Jeanne de Dammartin.

1224-39 Titular Countess Alix of Maçon  
Succeeded grandfather Guilllaume, but the county was occupied by France in 1224. She died 1252. 

1226-42 Regent Dowager Queen Blance de Castilla of France
1240-52 Sovereign Countess of Valois 
1248-52 (†) Regent of France
She governed France as regent during the minorship of her son Louis IX, and then again during his absence due to the 7th crusade. Of noble birth, Blanche was in the position to benefit from an education otherwise unavailable to women, or to most men. Her nobility and its accompanying education and wealth probably helped ensure the survival of her songs through the centuries. She lived (1187-1252).

1228-32 Sovereign Duchess Guillemots de Neuchâtel of Montpellier  
Succeeded her great-grandfather Thierry III.

Until 1228 Sovereign Dame Mahaut I de Bourbon of Dampierre-sur-label et Bourbon  
Daughter of Archibald VII de Bourbon and Adelheid de Bourgogne-Dijon. She married Gauche IV. Seigneur d'Ivrea-Vienne-Salins and Guido II, Seigneur de Dampierre-sur-label (d. 1228). Mother of a number of children (d. 1228).

1230-41 Sovereign Countess Marie d'Avenes of Blois and Chartres, Dame de Guise, d'Avesnes, Châteaurenault, Leuze, Landrechies et Trelon     
Succeeded mother, Marguerite as Countess and father as Dame de Guise Marie was married to Hugo I de Chatillon-sur-Marne, Count de Saint-Pôl, and was succeeded by son, Jean I. She lived (circa 1203-41).

1234-52 Joint Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Boulogne, Clermont and d'Aumale  
Daughter of Countess Mahaut-Mathilde de Dammartin and Boulogne and Philippe de France, Count de Clermont, Mortain, d'Aumale and Boulogne et Dammartin. Her brother, Alberic, Count de Dammartin, Clermont et d'Aumale, gave his lands to her and moved to England! She lived (1219-54).

1235-72 Sovereign Countess Yolande de Dreux of Penthièvre and Porhoët  
She was daughter of Jean I of Bretagne (1217-86), and married Hugues IX de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême.

1239-52 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Dammartin of Aumale  
Succeeded father Simon and reigned jointly with husband, King Fernando of Castilla.

1244-78 Sovereign Countess Béatrice Bérenguer of Provence and Forcalquier  
She was daughter of Raymond Bérenguer IV. Her older sisters Marguerite, Blance and Eleanore were married to king Louis IX of France, the Holy Roman Emperor, and Henry III of England respectively, and they challenged their fateher's will making the youngest the general heir. Béatrice was married to Charles d'Anjou, King of Napoli, who became Count of Provence and later also King of Napoli and Sicilia. The mother of five children, she lived (1234-67).

1244-circa 49 Sovereign Countess Mascarose I of Armagnc  
Her father, Géraud IV Trancaléon was count 1190-1219, and she succeeded brother Bernard V. She was joint ruler with husband Arnaud Otton de Lomagne (d. 1256) and after her death, they were succeeded by their daughter Mascarose II. Mascarose I (d. circa 1249).

1246 Regent Dowager Countess Marguerite II de France of Flanders and Rethel (The Netherlands and France)
1261-82 Sovereign Countess Palatine of Bourgogne and Countess of Artois and Salins  
Daughter of King Philippe V of France and Jeanne I de She married Louis II de Nevers, Count of Flanders and Rethel, who fell in battle in 1346 and regent for their son Louis II de Male (1330-84) She remained politically active to her death, and lived (circa 1312-82).

1248-1311 Sovereign Countess Beatrix of Montfort-L'Amauri  
Only child of Jean I de Montfort-l'Amaury and Jeanne de Châteaudun, and married to Robert IV de Dreux. Succeeded by daughter, Yolande de Dreux.

1248-79 Sovereign Countess Palatine Adelheide de Meran of Franche-Comté and Upper Burgundy  
Also known as Alix, she succeeded father, Otto III de Meran and reigned together with two husbands Hugues de Châlons until his death in 1266 and then with Philippe de Savoie (d. 1285). She was succeeded by son Otto IV. She lived (1209-79).

1249-55/56 Sovereign Countess Mascarose II of Armagnc  
Succeeded mother, Mascarose I, and reigned jointly with husband, Eskivat de Chabannais, Count of Bigorre until his death in 1251. She was succeeded by a distant relative.

1249-52 Sovereign Countess Marie de Lusignan of Eu, Dame de Melle, Chize, Civray and Benais   
Succeeded father Roul III de Lusignan-Issoudun and reigned jointly with husband Alphonse de Brienne. Succeeded by son, Jean II. She lived (circa 1220-60).

1249-71 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Champagne  
Succeeded father Raymond VII and reigned jointly with son-in-law Alphonse de Valois, Count de Pouitou, the son of Louis VIII.

1249-71 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Toulouse, Dame de Castres et Mirepoix  
The only daughter and heir of her father, Raimondo VII and his first wife, Sancha of Aragon. Her marriage to Alphonse de France, Count de Poiters (1220-71), son of King Louis VIII, was very happy. Her only daughter died and therefore the county revered to the crown after her death. She lived (1220-71).

1249-60 Sovereign VicountessClémence of Chateaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau and Saint Calais  
Succeeded under the regency of her mother after her father Geoffroy VI, was lost in the holy land. He had also taken part in the crusades in 1225 and 1229. In 1238 the Count of Champagne ceded the suzerainty of among others Châteaudun to the king of France, and the vicscounty therefore became a direct fief of the crown. Clémence was married to Robert de Dreux, and was succeeded by the oldest daughter, Alix I.

1249-53 Regent Dowager VicountessClémence des Roches of Chateaudun  
Regent for daughter, Clémence de Chateaudun, after the death of her second husband Geoffroy VI. She might also have been regent during his participations in crusades in 1225, 1229 in warfare in 1240 and 1242 and during his final journey to Jerusalem from 1248. Clémence's first husband was Thibault VI de Blois and she has brought along the Seigneurities of Chateau de Loir, Mayet, de la Suze and Loupelande in her marriage.

1200-05 Sovereign Countess Palatine Jeanne of Bourgogne  
She was daughter of Otton I et de Marguerite de Champagne, Comtesse Palatine de Bourgogne (1200-1205) and succeeded by sister Beatix II (1192-1231). She lived (1191-1205).

1200-31 Sovereign Countess Beatrix II of Franche-Comté  
1205-31 Countess Palatine de Bourgogne 
Succeeded father, Otto I in Franche-Comté and sister in Bourgogne, and reigned jointly with husband Duke Otto II de Meran (1208-34), who was succeeded by their son, Otto III de Meran and Franche-Comté. She lived (1192-1231).

1201 Pretender Philippine de Champagne-Jerusalem of Champagne  
She was the younger daughter of Henri de Champagne and Queen Isabella I of Jerusalem, she claimed the county of Champagne after the death of her cousin, Thibaut, jointly with her older sister, Queen Alice of Jerusalem, and the fights over the inheritance lasted about a quarter of a century. Some of the nobles and prelates supported Philippa and her sister, others supported Queen Blanca of Castilla and her son. In 1221 both sisters seceded their claims in exchange of a large payment. But in 1227 they made a new attempt and new fights erupted. But in 1234 the inheritance was finally settled, the sisters were granted a large sum of money and Alice had the treaty confirmed by her son, Henri of Cyprus and her daughters Maria and Isabella. Philippa was married to Sire Erard III de Brienne, mother of seven children, and lived (circa 1195- 1250).

1202-circa 44 Sovereign Countess Isabelle Taillefer of Angoulême  
She was daughter of Adémer III Taillefer, who was pretender to the county (1181-1202) against his sister, Countess Mahaut. After his death she claimed the title, 6 years before Mahaut died. First married to King John without Land of England 1216, when he died when she was visiting Queen Blance in Paris, after having returned to England she gave birth to a daughter. After the coronation of her 8 year old son, Henry, she was asked by the Barons to leave England and she returned to her own lands. Here she arranged for her daughter to marry Hugues X de Lusignan, Count de La Marche, to whom she was engaged before her marriage to John, but married him herself in 1218. She was very powerful in both counties thoug her husband was titular co-ruler. He and her son, Henry III, were engaged in fights against the French king in 1242. The following year she devided her possessions among those of her 13 children who had survived infancy, and joined the Chapter of Fontrevault. After her death her husband joined one of the crucades and died in the Holy Land in 1249. She lived (1186-1246).

1202-after 05 Regent Countess Alice of Angoulême  
Widow of the pretender, Adémer Taillefer to the county, she was regent for daughter, Isabelle. 

1203-21 Sovereign Countess Alix de Bretagne  
1221-37 Regent
She succeeded the older son of her mother, Constance, and her first husband, Arthur I. Her husband, Pierre I was count 1213-21. He was also count of Penthièvre and Richmond. Their son, Jean I the Read succeeded as count when his father died, with her as regent. She died 1250.

1203-28 Sovereign Countess Beatrice de Thiers of Chalons-sur-Saône and Beaune   
Succeeded father Guillaume VI and Married Etienne III de Bourgogne (1170-1240). After her death in 1228, the county was inherited by son, Jean I (1190-1266).

1205-44 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Constantinople of Flanders Hainault and Namur (Belgium and France)
She was the oldest daughter of Boudewijn IX. In 1212 she married to Ferrand of Portugal. As he refused to support king Philippe II of France during an attack on England, the latter attacked Flanders. Ferrand lost the battle and was taken prisoner in 1214. In 1226 Johanna negotiated the Peace of Melun. In 1333 Ferrand died, and Johanna remarried in 1237 to Thomas of Savoie. She had no children and was succeeded by sister, Marguerite II.

1205-12 Sovereign Countess Elisabeth de Luxembourg of Saint-Pôl  
She was daughter of Hugues IV Camp d'Avesnes (d. 1205), and married Gaucher III, seigneur de Châtillon, de Troissy, de Montjay, de Crécy and de Pierrefons (d. 1219). Succeeded by son, Gui I, who married Agnès, Countess of Nevers and Auxerre. She lived (1179-1263).

1207-57 Sovereign Countess Mahaut I de Courtenay of Nevers, d'Auxerre and Tonnerre  
Daughter of Comtesse Agnès and Pierre de Courtenay Count of Namur 1212, Emperor of Constantinople 1217, she married Hervé IV de Donzy, Seigneur de Donzy and Guy IV, Count de Forez. 

1209-19 Regent Dowager Countess Garsende de Sabran of Provence  
She was regent for Ramón Berenguer IV together with King Pedro of Aragón (1209-13), Count Sancho de Bouillon (1213-16) and Nuño Sánchez (1213-121..).  

1214-circa 60 Sovereign Countess Mahaut II of Dammartin and Boulogne   
Also known as Mathilde, she succeeded mother, Countess Ide, who ruled (1173-1214). Her mother was daughter of Countess Marie (1159-69) who again was daughter of Countess Mahaut I (circa 1125-51). Mahaut was married to Count Philippe Hurepel de Clermont-en-Beauvais, Mortain, Aumale, Dammartin et Boulogne (the latter by the right of his wife) (son of King Philippe II Augusta of France) and in 1238 to King Alfonso III of Portugal (1210-79). She was succeeded by daughter, Jeanne, and lived (1190/95-circa 1260).

1215-42 Sovereign Dame Mahaut I of Bourbon   
She was the heir of Archambaud V (1116-71), and first married Gautier de Vienne, who ruled Bourbon (1171-1215). She married Gui II de Dampierre and had two daughters, Mahaut II de Dampierre and Agnes. She was succeeded by Archambaud VII upon her death in 1242.

1218-30 Sovereign Countess Marguerite de Champagne-Blois of Blois and Châteaudun     
Together with sister, she succeeded the son of their brother, Thibaut VI, Her first husband, Hugo III, Seigneur d'Oisy, Vicomte von Cambrai died in 1189, and three years later she married Otto I. von Hohenstaufen Pfalzgraf von Burgundy (1166/73-1200). Two years after his death she married Walter II d'Avesnes, Seigneur de Guise et Conde (d. 1243/46). She was succeeded by daughter Marie d'Avesnes Countess de Blois, Dame d'Avesmes and de Guise (circa 1203-30-41). Marguerite lived (1164-1230).

1218-48 Sovereign Countess Isabelle de Champagne-Blois of Chartres and Romorantin     
Succeeded her nephew together with her sister, Marguerite. She was first married to Sulpice d'Amboise and secondly to Jean de Montmirail, Vicomte  Cambrai. (d. 1248).

1218-23 Sovereign Countess Petronille of Bar-sur-Seine     
Her father, Milon II, count of Bar-sur-Seine, died in 1191, She was his only child, and was married to Hugues du Puiset, Vicomte de Chartres.

1218 Regent Duchess Alice de Vergy of Bourgogne  
The widow of Eudes III she was regent for Hugues VI, Duke of Burgundy, Count of Chalon, Titular King of Thessalonica etc. Eudes III was first married to Countess Teresa of Portugal (1157-1218) until their divorce in 1195). Eudes and Alice had four children. 

1219-20 Sovereign Countess Alice of Alençon  
Succeeded Robert IV and in the period 1220-68 the county was ruled by the kings of France. 

1221-51 Sovereign Countess Marie of Ponthieu  
Succeeded father Guillaume III and reigned jointly with Count Simon de Dammartin d'Aumale and Mathieu de Montorenci until his death in 1250. Succeeded by daughter Jeanne de Dammartin.

1224-39 Titular Countess Alix of Maçon  
Succeeded grandfather Guilllaume, but the county was occupied by France in 1224. She died 1252. 

1226-42 Regent Dowager Queen Blance de Castilla of France
1240-52 Sovereign Countess of Valois 
1248-52 (†) Regent of France
She governed France as regent during the minorship of her son Louis IX, and then again during his absence due to the 7th crusade. Of noble birth, Blanche was in the position to benefit from an education otherwise unavailable to women, or to most men. Her nobility and its accompanying education and wealth probably helped ensure the survival of her songs through the centuries. She lived (1187-1252).

1228-32 Sovereign Duchess Guillemots de Neuchâtel of Montpellier  
Succeeded her great-grandfather Thierry III.

Until 1228 Sovereign Dame Mahaut I de Bourbon of Dampierre-sur-label et Bourbon  
Daughter of Archibald VII de Bourbon and Adelheid de Bourgogne-Dijon. She married Gauche IV. Seigneur d'Ivrea-Vienne-Salins and Guido II, Seigneur de Dampierre-sur-label (d. 1228). Mother of a number of children (d. 1228).

1230-41 Sovereign Countess Marie d'Avenes of Blois and Chartres, Dame de Guise, d'Avesnes, Châteaurenault, Leuze, Landrechies et Trelon     
Succeeded mother, Marguerite as Countess and father as Dame de Guise Marie was married to Hugo I de Chatillon-sur-Marne, Count de Saint-Pôl, and was succeeded by son, Jean I. She lived (circa 1203-41).

1234-52 Joint Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Boulogne, Clermont and d'Aumale  
Daughter of Countess Mahaut-Mathilde de Dammartin and Boulogne and Philippe de France, Count de Clermont, Mortain, d'Aumale and Boulogne et Dammartin. Her brother, Alberic, Count de Dammartin, Clermont et d'Aumale, gave his lands to her and moved to England! She lived (1219-54).

1235-72 Sovereign Countess Yolande de Dreux of Penthièvre and Porhoët  
She was daughter of Jean I of Bretagne (1217-86), and married Hugues IX de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême.

1239-52 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Dammartin of Aumale  
Succeeded father Simon and reigned jointly with husband, King Fernando of Castilla.

1244-78 Sovereign Countess Béatrice Bérenguer of Provence and Forcalquier  
She was daughter of Raymond Bérenguer IV. Her older sisters Marguerite, Blance and Eleanore were married to king Louis IX of France, the Holy Roman Emperor, and Henry III of England respectively, and they challenged their fateher's will making the youngest the general heir. Béatrice was married to Charles d'Anjou, King of Napoli, who became Count of Provence and later also King of Napoli and Sicilia. The mother of five children, she lived (1234-67).

1244-circa 49 Sovereign Countess Mascarose I of Armagnc  
Her father, Géraud IV Trancaléon was count 1190-1219, and she succeeded brother Bernard V. She was joint ruler with husband Arnaud Otton de Lomagne (d. 1256) and after her death, they were succeeded by their daughter Mascarose II. Mascarose I (d. circa 1249).

1246 Regent Dowager Countess Marguerite II de France of Flanders and Rethel (The Netherlands and France)
1261-82 Sovereign Countess Palatine of Bourgogne and Countess of Artois and Salins  
Daughter of King Philippe V of France and Jeanne I de She married Louis II de Nevers, Count of Flanders and Rethel, who fell in battle in 1346 and regent for their son Louis II de Male (1330-84) She remained politically active to her death, and lived (circa 1312-82).

1248-1311 Sovereign Countess Beatrix of Montfort-L'Amauri  
Only child of Jean I de Montfort-l'Amaury and Jeanne de Châteaudun, and married to Robert IV de Dreux. Succeeded by daughter, Yolande de Dreux.

1248-79 Sovereign Countess Palatine Adelheide de Meran of Franche-Comté and Upper Burgundy  
Also known as Alix, she succeeded father, Otto III de Meran and reigned together with two husbands Hugues de Châlons until his death in 1266 and then with Philippe de Savoie (d. 1285). She was succeeded by son Otto IV. She lived (1209-79).

1249-55/56 Sovereign Countess Mascarose II of Armagnc  
Succeeded mother, Mascarose I, and reigned jointly with husband, Eskivat de Chabannais, Count of Bigorre until his death in 1251. She was succeeded by a distant relative.

1249-62 Sovereign Countess Mahaut II de Dampierre of Bourbon, Baroness of Donzy, Perche-Gouet and Montmirail  
1257-61  Sovereign Countess of Nevers
Daughter of Dame Mahaut I and Gui II de Dampierre. She succeeded baron Archambaud VII, who had succeeded her mother in 1142. In Nevers she succeeded her grandmother, Mahaut de Courtenay (1182-1257). Mahaut was joint ruler with husband, Eudes de Bourgogne, Count de Nevers and Auxerre. (1230-66/69), Her only daughter, Yolande, was heir of Nevers, Donzy, Tonnerre und Ricays (1248-80) and was married Count Jean Tristan de Valois (1250-70). In Bourbon Mahaut was succeeded by her sister; Agnés. Mahaut lived (1234-62).

1249-52 Sovereign Countess Marie de Lusignan of Eu, Dame de Melle, Chize, Civray and Benais   
Succeeded father Roul III de Lusignan-Issoudun and reigned jointly with husband Alphonse de Brienne. Succeeded by son, Jean II. She lived (circa 1220-60).

1249-71 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Champagne  
Succeeded father Raymond VII and reigned jointly with son-in-law Alphonse de Valois, Count de Pouitou, the son of Louis VIII.

1249-71 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Toulouse, Dame de Castres et Mirepoix  
The only daughter and heir of her father, Raimondo VII and his first wife, Sancha of Aragon. Her marriage to Alphonse de France, Count de Poiters (1220-71), son of King Louis VIII, was very happy. Her only daughter died and therefore the county revered to the crown after her death. She lived (1220-71).

1249-60 Sovereign Vicountess Clémence of Chateaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau and Saint Calais  
Succeeded under the regency of her mother after her father Geoffroy VI, was lost in the holy land. He had also taken part in the crusades in 1225 and 1229. In 1238 the Count of Champagne ceded the suzerainty of among others Châteaudun to the king of France, and the vicscounty therefore became a direct fief of the crown. Clémence was married to Robert de Dreux, and was succeeded by the oldest daughter, Alix I.
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1249-53 Regent Dowager Vicountess Clémence des Roches of Chateaudun  
Regent for daughter, Clémence de Chateaudun, after the death of her second husband Geoffroy VI. She might also have been regent during his participations in crusades in 1225, 1229 in warfare in 1240 and 1242 and during his final journey to Jerusalem from 1248. Clémence's first husband was Thibault VI de Blois and she has brought along the Seigneurities of Chateau de Loir, Mayet, de la Suze and Loupelande in her marriage.

1251-79 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Dammartin of Ponthieu  
Succeeded mother, Marie and reigned together with husband, Jean II de Nesle-falvi. Succeeded by daughter, Leonor de Castilla, Queen of England.

1253-5.. Regent Dowager Princess Marguerite de Dampierre-Bourbon of Navarra and Champagne (Spain and France)
After the death of her husband, Thibaut, who succeeded his father as Count of Champagne and mother, Queen Blanca, as king of Navarra, Marguerite was regent for her son Thibaut II (also Thibaud V de Champagne). She (d. 1256).

1255.... Regent Dowager Duchess Catherine van Limburg of Haute-Lorraine (Ober-Lothringen)  
Daughter of Walram IV of Limburg-Luxemburg and Ermensinde II of Luxembourg, as widow of Duke Matthias II, she was regent for her son, Friedrich III (1238-1303). Her rule was marked by the fightings between Bar, Luxembourg and Champagne who all claimed the lordship of Ligny and she also engaged in fighting with Neufchatel in Switzerland. In 1255 her son was declared free of her guardianship, and she died shortly after. Catherine lived (circa 1215-circa 1255).
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1257-62 Sovereign Countess Mahaut II de Bourgogne of Auxerre, Tonnerre and Nevers, Dame de Bourbon, Perche-Goët, Montjoy, Thorigny, Broigny, et de Saint-Aignan, Baroness de Donzy  
The daughter of Yolande de Châtillon-sur-Marne and Archambault IX de Dampierre, Seigneur de Bourbon, she succeeded her great-grandmother, Mahaut I, (Countess of Nevers 1199, Countess of Auxerre and Tonnerre 1219) and was joint ruler with her husband Eudes de Bourgogne (d. 1269). After Mahaut's death in 1262, her husband administered the counties until his death, and after that they remained vacant until her three daughters received their inheritance in 1273. Alix de Bourgogne became Countess of Auxerre; Yolande became Countess of Nevers and Marguerite Countess of Tonnerre. Mahaut lived (1249-62).

1260-1300 Sovereign VicountessAlix I de Dreux of Chateaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau and Saint Calais  
Succeeded mother, Clémence de Chateaudun, and reigned under the regency of her uncle, Simon de Dreux, the brother of her father, Robert de Dreux. She married Raoul de Clermont, Seigneur de Nesle, who died in battle 1302. She was succeeded by her only daughter, Alix II, and lived (1255-1300).

1261-82 Sovereign Countess Marguerite I of Bourgogne  
Succeeded son of sister Jeanne II. Marguerite I married Louis II, Count of Flanders. The husbands of her daughter, Marguerite: Philippe de Rouvre and Philippe de France were Dukes of Bourgogne in the same period. 

1262-88 Sovereign Countess Agnes de Dampierre of Bourbon  
Succeeded sister, Mahaut II. She reigned jointly with husbands Jean de Bourgogne (d. 1268) and Robert I d'Artois. Succeeded by daughter Béatrix de Bourgogne. 

1263-91 Sovereign Countess Marie of Limoges  
Succeeded father Gui VI le Preux and reigned jointly with husband Duke Arthur de Bretagne (from 1305). He was succeeded in Limonges by their son, Jean I in 1301.

1265-80 Sovereign Countess Yolande de Bourgogne of Nevers (France/Belgium)
Daughter of Eudes de Bourgogne and Mahaut II de Bourgogne of Auxerre, Nevers, Auxerre and Tonnerre, and reigned jointly with her first husband Jean Tristan de France, Count de Nevers and Valois (1250-70), the son of king Louis IX (1215-70) and Marguerite de Provence. After Jean's death she reigned jointly with second husband, Robert de Dampierre, Count de Flanders (1280-1332). Yolande's sisters succeeded in Auxerre and Tonnerre.

1265-97 Sovereign Baroness and Dame Isabelle of Beaujeu   
The daughter of , Humbert V, who was killed in Egypt 1250 and Marguerite de Bauge, Dame de Miribel (d. ca 1252), she succeeded her brother, and was married to Isabelle, Count Simon II de Semur-en-Brionnais, seigneur de Luzy; and Renaud d'Albon, Count de Forez. Another of her sisters, Sibylle, were Dame de Belleroche. Isabelle (d. 1297).

1268-77 Sovereign Countess Béatrix I of Charolais, Dame de Bourbon et Saint-Just   
1268-1310 Daughter of Jean II de Charolais (d. 1268) and Agnès, Dame de Bourbon (d. 1283) and married to Robert, Clermont-en-Beauvaisis.

1260/70 Regent Dowager Countess Beatrix de Savoie of Viennois, d'Albon, Grenoble and Gap   
After the death of her husband, Guigues VII, Dauphin de Viennois, Comte d'Albon et Grenoble (circa 1225-1269/70) she was regent for son, Jean. She was Dame de Faucigny in her own right and lived (circa 1237-1310).

1273-80 Sovereign Countess Yolande de Bourgogne of Nevers   
The oldest daughter Mahaut II de Dampierre of Nevers, d'Auxerre et de Tonnerre (1249-57-62) and Eudes de Bourgogne (d. 1269), she and her two sisters divided the inheritance in 1173. She first married Jean Tristan of France, Count of Valois (d. 1270), secondly Robert de Béthune, the future Count of Flanders. She was succeeded by her son Louis I (1280-1322), who married Countess Jeanne de Rethel.

1273-93 Sovereign Countess Marguerite de Bourgogne of Tonnerre  
The second daughter of Mahaut II de Dampierre, she was married to Charles d'Anjou, King of Sicily and Napoli, Count of Anjou, Maine and Tonnerre. In 1293 she lègue the county to her nephew, Guillaume de Chalon-Auxerre (1279-1304), son of her sister Alix She lived (1254-93).

1273-79 Sovereign Countess Alix de Bourgogne of Auxerre  
The youngest daughter of Mahaut II, she was joint ruler with husband Jean I de Châlons, sire de Rochefort (1243-76-90-1309), who was succeeded by their son,Guillaume de Chalon-Auxerre, after her death. Alix lived (1254-90).

1274-1305 Queen Regnant Juana I of Navarra, Countess of Champagne and Brie (Spain and France)
Also known as Jeanne, she was married to king Philippe V of France (1268-1314), who became king of Navarra by the right of his wife. She left him to reign in Navarra and stayed in Champagne. Succeeded by her son, Louis X, king of France and Navarra. She lived (1272-1305).

1274-76 Regent Dowager Queen Blance d'Artois  of Navarra and Champagne (Spain and France)
After the death of her husband Henri III, she was regent for daughter Juana I. She left the administration of Navarra to King Philippe III of England after her marriage to Edmond of Lancaster, brother of Edward I of England, and they administered Champagne until Juana came of age in 1284.

1279-92 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Chatillon of Blois, Chartres, de Dunois, Dame de Châtillon, d'Avesness and de Crécy     
Succeeded father Jean I de Chatillon, count of Blois and Chartres (1241-79). She married count Pierre d'Alençon, and since she had no children, she was succeeded by her German cousin Hugues de Chatillon, and (d. 1291/92).

1279-90 Sovereign Countess Leonor de Castilla of Ponthièu and Montreuil     
Succeeded mother Jeanne de Dammartin and married to king Edward I of England (1239-72-1307) and thus the county was inherited by the kings of England. Also known as Queen Eleonor of Castille, she gave birth to sixteen children, six of whom survived into adulthood, but only two or three of whom outlived their parents. Her father was Fernando III of Castilla and Leon, and lived (1244-1290).

1279-86 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Blois, Chartres and Dunois, Dame of Châteaurenault, Avesnes, Guise et Grécy     
Succeeded father, Jean I and was married to Pierre I d'Alencon, who was also styled Count of Blois. In 1286 she sold the county to the king of France. She lived (1279-91). 

1281-1301 Sovereign Countess Anne of Viennois and Dauphiné     
Succeeded nephew, Jean I, and reigned jointly with husband, Humbert I de la Tour du Pin. Succeeded by husband, Jean II.  

1281-... Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Dreux of Braine     
Daughter of Robert IV de Dreux and Beatrix de Montfort. Married to Count Jean IV de Roussy and Jean de Bar, Seigneur de Puisaye. 

1283-1332 Sovereign Countess Guillemette de Neufchâtel of Montbéllard     
Succeeded her great-grandfather Thierry III (1237-82) and reigned jointly with husband Renaud de Bourgogne until his death in 1321. 

1283-1308 Titular Empress Catherina I de Courtenay of Constantinople (Turkey), Dame of Courtenay  
Also Sovereign Princess of Achaia (Albaina) and Dame de Courtenay  
Daughter of Philippe, the son of Emperor Boudewijn, who was deposed 1261.
Plans were made to marry her to Freiderich of Sicilia, but nothing came of it. The pope interfered, there were also attempts to have her marry the heir to the Byzantine throne, Michael IX, but she declined because the contract was not lucrative enough for her, and in 1302 she married Count Charles I de Valois (1270-1325), who was planning a cruzade against Byzantine when she died. Mother of three daughters and a son, who died just before herself, and she was therefore succeeded by the oldest, Catherine II, as heir to the Latin Empire of the East. Catharine I lived (1274-1308).

1283-84 Sovereign Countess Constancede Moncada of Bigorre  
Succeeded Eskivat de Chabannais, who had succeeded their grandmother, Countess Petronille, (1190-1251). Eskivat was grandson of Petronille and her second husband, Gui de Montfort and Constance was granddaughter of Petronille and her fourth husband, Boson de Mastas. Constance's first husband, Henry Plantagenet of Cornwall, the son of Richard, Earl of Cornwall and King of The Romans and Isabel Marshal, was murdered by his Montfort cousins at Viterbo 1271. She was joint ruler with her husband, Lori, who reigned until 1292. (d. 1310).

1288-1310 Sovereign Dame Beatrix de Bourgogne of Bourbon  
Succeeded mother, Dame Agnès and reigned jointly with Robert II de France, Count de Clermont (d. 1317). Succeeded by son Louis I, who was given the title of Duke de Bourbon. 

1290-99 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Anjou and Maine  
Succeeded father Charles II. She reigned jointly with husband, Charles II (1270-1325), , Count of Valois, Titular King of Aragon, Valencia and Barcelona, Titular Emperor of Constantinople, who was succeeded by their son in Anjou and Maine in 1313 and after his death also in Valois and Chartres. He became king Philippe VI in 1328.  

1290 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Béarn  
Succeeded father, Gaston VII and in 1290 her husband, Roger Bernhard, Count of Foix also became count of Béarn. Roger Bernard III., who, more famous as a poet than as a warrior, was taken prisoner both by Philip III. of France and by Peter III. of Aragon. Their marriage led to the outbreak of a long feud between the houses of Foix and Armagnac; a quarrel which was continued by Roger Bernards son and successor, Gaston I., who became count in 1302, inheriting both Foix and Beam. Becoming embroiled with the French king, Philip IV., in consequence of the struggle with the count of Armagnac, Gaston was imprisoned in Paris; but quickly regaining his freedom he accompanied King Louis X. on an expedition into Flanders in 1315, and died on his return to France in the same year.

1300-20 Sovereign Vicountess Alix II de Clermont of Chateaudun, Dame de Mondoubleau and Saint Calais  
Succeeded mother, Alix I de Dreux. Her first husband was Guillaume de Dampierre of Flanders, Seigneur de Tenremonde et de Richebourg - younger son of the Count Guy de Dampierre of Flanders - and the second Jean de Chalon, Seigneur d'Arly. In 1320 she resigned her title in favour of her son Jean de Dampirre-Flandres, who was succeeded by his oldest daughter, Marie, in 1325. Alix II (d. 1330).

1302-29  Sovereign Countess Mahaut of Artois, Dame de Conches (Belgium - France)
1302-21 Regent Dowager Countess of Bourgogne 
She succeeded father, Robert II, under the suzerainty of the French king. She was a forceful administrator and defeated revolts of the nobles. She was married to Othon IV of Bourgogne (1248-1302) and was succeeded by sister Jeanne I. Mahaut lived (1268-1329).

1304-08 Sovereign Vicountess Marguerite de Bourgogne of Tonnerre  
Daughter of Mahaut de Tonnerre and Duke Eudes de Bourgogne. The second wife of Charles I of France, Count d'Anjou et du Maine, Provence et de Forcalquier etc. King of Sicilia (1265), Titular King of Jerusalem (1267) and King of Napoli and Jerusalem (1265). Marguerite lived (1249-1308).

1304-11 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Touraine  
Succeeded father, Raymond VII and reigned jointly with husband, Bernard II de Comminges, who was succeeded by their son, Jean in 1335 and then by their daughter Cécile.

1306-44 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Soissons   
Daughter of Hugues, married to Jean seigneur de Beaumont, Valenciennes and Condé.

1308-46 Sovereign Dame Catherine II de Valois of Courtenay, Blacon and Montargie    and Titular Empress of Constantinople
1333-46 Sovereign Princess of Achaia (Morea) (Greece)
1341-46 Governor of Kephalliena (Greek Island-State)
She inherited the title of titular Empress from her mother, Chatherine I de Courtenay (1283-1308), and was involved in the intrigues of the court of Giovanna I of Napoli and was probably involved the murder of Giovanna's husband, Andreas of Hungary. She was married to Philippe II de Tarent, and all of her three sons succeeded him as Prince of Tarent. Her father was king Charles I of France, and she lived (1301-46).

1315-29 Sovereign Countess Jeanne I de Châlons of Franche-Comté and Bourgogne   
1329 Sovereign Countess  of Artois, Flanders and Brabant (France and Belgium)
In Artois, she was known as Jeanne II. Succeeded Robert and married to King Philippe V of France, who succeeded to the throne in 1317, after having acted as regent for his infant nephew, Jean I, who died after a few months. She succeeded her father Otto I and in Artois etc, she succeeded her sister, Mahaut. Her only son died in 1317 and she was succeeded by the oldest of her three daughters, Jeanne II and III in all her possessions. She lived (1294-1329).

1316-60 Sovereign Countess Béatrix de Bourbon of Charolais  
Daughter of Jean comte de Charolais, seigneur de Saint-Just and Jeanne dame d'Argiès et de Calku and married to Jean I comte d'Armagnac, who died 1373.

1316 Regent Dowager Queen Clemence d'Anjou-Napoli of France
When her husband Louis X (1289-1314-16) died she was pregnant, making it impossible to know Louis's successor until the time his child was born. If the child were a son, he would succeed Louis as king: had the child been a daughter, Louis would have been succeeded by his brother Philip V. (John I's half-sister Jeanne, as a female, could not succeed to the throne of France; she did, however, retain rights in the succession of Navarre). She was joint regent with her brother-in-law Philip for the five months remaining until the birth her child, who turned out to be male. But Jean I, only lived five days was succeeded by his uncle Philippe V.

1317-28 Sovereign Countess Isabelle de Castilla of Limoges   
She was married to Jean I, who was Duke of Bretagne from 1312. 1314-17 his brother, Gui VII, was count, until she took over as Countess. After her death, her husband was count again, until he was succeeded in 1341 by niece, Jeanne, who had succeeded his father (the said Gui VII) as Countess of Penthièvre in 1331. Isabella (d. 1328).

1317-58 Sovereign Countess Mahaut de Châtillon-sur-Marne of Saint-Pôl   
She was daughter of Guy I (1254-1317) and Marie de Bretagne and was married to Charles de Valois. She was mother of Marie (1309-32), Isabelle (1313-83), Blanche (1317-48) and Jean (d. 1344), and lived (1293-1358).

1325 Sovereign VicountessMarie de Dampierre-Flanders of Chateaudun, Baroness of Mondoubleau and Dame of Nesle and Saint Calais  
Succeeded father Jean de Dampierre-Flanders, whose mother, Alix II had abdicated in his favour in 1320. Marie transmitted the Viscounty in favour of her sister, Marguerite, but kept the Barony of Mondoubleau and the Seigneurity Saint Calais. She was first married to Count Robert VIII de Boulogne et d'Auvergne and secondly to Ingeler I d'Ambroise, with whom she had four children, of which the three daughters reached adulthood. (d. 1355).

1325.... Sovereign VicountessMarguerite de Dampierre-Flanders of Chateaudun, Dame of Nesle  
Succeeded sister Marie de Dampierre-Flanders. Married to Guillaume de Craon and mother of 7 children. Succeeded by son, Guillaume II de Craon. 

1328-92 Sovereign Countess Blanche de France of Beaumont   
Daughter of Charles IV, Count de La Marche and King of France and Navarra (1295-1328) and his third wife, Jeanne d'Évreux (1310-71). She was married to Philippe duc d'Orleans, Count de Valois et Beaumont (d. 1375), and lived (1228-92).

1328-32 Regent Dowager Duchess Isabella von Habsburg of Lorraine (Lothringen)  
Widow of Herzogs Ferri IV (Friedrich V )  and regent for Rudolf or Raoul (1328-46). She (d. 1332).

1329-47 Sovereign Countess Jeanne II de France of Artois, Flanders, Brabant, Franche-Comté and Upper Burgundy (France and Belgium)
1346-56 Regent Dowager Countess of Rouvers 
1356-58 Regent of Franche-Comté and Artois 
The daughter of Countess Jeanne I and King Philippe V of France, she married to Eudes IV, Duc de Bourgogne, thereby uniting the two Bourgognes, which had been seperated for 400 years. She was first succeeded by son, Philippe de Rouvres Bourgogne, Comte d'Artois and D'Auvergne, who succeeded his father in Rouvers and his grandmother in Franche-Comté etc. In 1361 he was succeeded by his cousin, Marguerite, daughter of Jeanne's sister by the same name. Jeanne II lived (1326-60).

1331-84 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Penthièvre 
1341-84 Sovereign Duchess of Bretagne, Viscomtesse de Limoges and Dame de Mayenne  
Daughter of Guy de Bretagne, Count de Penthièvre, who died in 1331. She succeeded her uncle, Jean III of Bretagne. Married Charles de Blois, Seigneur of Châtillon-sur-Marne, who became duke by the right of his wife. She was known as Jeanne "La Boiteuse" and lived (1319-84)

1332-60 Sovereign Countess Jeanne I of Auvergne and Boulogne
1349-50 Regent Dowager Duchess of Bourgogne   
She succeeded father, Guillaume XII, and first married Duke Philippe de Bourgogne, son of Countess Jeanne II of Bourgogne and Artois from 1329. Philippe was killed at the siege of Aiguillon, and after the death of his father, Eudes IV in 1349, she became regent for her son Philippe I de Rouvres (1349-61). The following year she married Jean II de Valois, Count of Guyenne and King of France (1350-64). Her son Married Marguerite de Flanders, who succeeded as Countess in 1384. Her daughter Marguerite inherited the titles of Countess of Bourgogne and Artois in 1361. Jeanne lived (1326-60). 

1334-36 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Joigny, Dame de Mercoeur and   
She was daughter of Jean II. first wife of Charles II de Valois, Comte d'Alençon (1297-1346).

1339-50 Sovereign VicountessCécile of Touraine  
Daughter of Countess Marguerite. She succeeded brother, Jean, and reigned jointly with husband Jaime de Aragón, Count de Urgell, until his death in 1346. Cécile and succeeded by brother-in-law Guillaume Roger de Beaufort (1350-93), who was first succeeded by son and in 1417 by his daughter Eléonore. 

1342-87 Sovereign Countess Blanche d'Aumale  
Succeeded father, Jean II and reigned jointly with husband Jean II d'Harcourt until he was killed in 1355. Succeeded by son Jean IV. 

1343-82 Queen Regnant Giovanna I d'Anjou de Napoli and Sicilia and Sardegna, Sovereign Duchess of Pouilles and Calabre, Princess of Capua,  Sovereign Countess of Provence, Forcalquier and Piémont (Italy and France)
1374-76 Princess of Achaia and Baroness of Vostitsa (Greece) and Titular Queen of Jerusalem
Also known as Jeanne or Juanna, and at the age of 17 she was crowned by her Grandfather, Roberto d’Anjou, and inherited a flourishing kingdom, however tormented by dynastic troubles. In 1342 Giovanna married Andrea of Hungary, who died two years later in consequence of a conspiracy, to which perhaps the Queen herself participated in. Her brother-in-law took his revenge invading Naples. In 1346 she had married her cousin Luigi d’Anjou of Taranto. Because of the invasion she flew to Avignon in Provence, in 1347 she sold it to Pope Clemente VI who supported her as an exchange to hold back the Hungarian expansion in Italy. After the death of her second husband, Giovanna got married with Juan of Aragon, who died very soon in consequence of an illness. Then in the same year she married a skilful captain, Otto of Braunschweig, to better defend her reign. She didn’t have any heir and this caused succession problems. Pope Urbano VI excommunicated her because she had backed up the Anti-Pope Clemente VII. Her cousin, Carlo of Durazzo of Taranto, invaded her reign also because she had appointed as her successor Louis I d’Anjou, brother of the King of France. Giovanna fell prisoner and Carlo imprisoned her in Muro Lucano, a small town in Southern Italy, and had her strangled in 1383. She lived (1343-83).

1344-50 Sovereign Countess Jeanne I of Soissons, Dame de Beaumont, Chimay, Valenciennes and Condé   
Daughter of Countess Marguerite and Jean, Seigneur de Beaumont. She married Louis I, Count de Blois and Dunois, Seigneur de Châtillon and Seigneur d'Avesness.

1345-46 Sovereign Countess Jeanne I de Montpensier of Dreux and Braine  
Her father Pierre (1298-1331-45), was the last of three brothers to succeed each others as counts of Dreux since the death of their father, Jean II in 1309. Jeanne was succeeded by aunt, Jeanne II. She lived (1315-46).

1346-54/55 Sovereign Countess Jeanne II of Dreux and Braine  
The daughter of Jean II le Bon, she succeeded her niece, Jeanne I, and reigned jointly with husband Louis de Thouars (d. 1370). First succeeded by son and then by daughters Petronelle and Marguerite. Jeanne lived (1308-54/5).

1346 Regent Dowager Countess Marguerite de France of Flanders and Rethel 
1361-82 Sovereign Countess Palantine of Bourgogne and Countess of Franche-Comté, Artois and Salins (The low countries)
Daughter of King Philippe V of France and Jeanne I d'Artois (1329-30). She married Louis II de Nevers, Count of Flanders and Rethel, who fell in battle in 1346 and was regent for their son, Louis II de Male (1330-84), and in her own lands, she succeeded the son of her sister Jeanne II's grandchild as Marguerite I. She abdicated in favour of son, but remained politically active to her death. Her son was succeeded by her daughter, Marguerite II, in 1384. Marguerite I lived (circa 1312-82).

1346-6.. Regent Dowager Duchess Marie de Blois of Lorraine  
Widow of Rudolf or Roul and regent for son Johann I of Lothringen or Lorraine (1346-90).

1356-60 Sovereign Countess Isabella of Brienne, Lecce and Conversano, Dame de Ramerupt and Titluar Duchess of Athens (France, Italy and Greece)
After brother, Gautier, was killed in the battle by Poitiers, she and her husband, Gautier IV d'Enghien, Seigneur de Tubize et Lembeek, the family possessions in France and Italy. She was the only daughter of Duke Gautiers V de Brienne and Jeanne de Chatillon and succeeded. She lived (ca.1300/05-60).

1360-78 Sovereign Countess Mahaud de Châtillon of Saint-Pôl   
Daughter of Jean de Chatillon (1292-1334) and succeeded brother, Gui (d. 1360). She was married to Guy de Ligny and Charles de France, Count de Valois etc. And lived (1293-1358).

1361-82 Sovereign Countess Marguerite I de France of Bourgogne and d'Artois  
The Daughter of Jean II of France and Jeanne de Boulogne et d'Auvergne, she was appointed to the title after the death of her half-brother, Philippe I de Rouvrens, Duke and Count of Bourgogne, who had succeeded their mother mother. Her father kept the title of Duke of Bourgogne and the counties of Boulogne and Auvergne went to Jean de Boulogne, the uncle of her mother. She was already a widow of Louis I of Flanders, Rethel and Nevers. In 1366 the word Franche-Comté was used for the first time to designate the County of Bourgogne.

1364-79 Countess Isabelle of Rouci   
She succeeded her father.

1365-77/78 Co-Sovereign Countess Petronelle de Thouars of Dreux  
Succeeded brother Simon, daughter of Jeanne II (1309/9-46-54/5). Reigned jointly with sister, and was deposed by the king of France. Petronelle (d. 1393).

1365-77/78 Co-Sovereign Countess Marguerite de Thouars of Dreux  
Ruled jointly with sister, and was deposed by the king of France. Marguerite (d. 1404).

1366-74 Regent Dowager Countess Jeanne de Castilla of Vendôme  
After the death of her husband, Jean VI, she was regent for son, Bouchard VII until his death, when her daughter succeeded to the countly title.

Until 1268 Baroness Agnès de Faucigny of Faucigny
Succeeded father, Aimone I de Faucigny

1268-1310 Baroness Beatrice de Savoie of Faucigny
She succeeded her parents, Pietro II, Count of Savoy, Moriana and Chablais, Duke of Aosta, Marquis of Susa and Marquis in Italia, Count of Richmond etc and Baroness Agnès de Faucigny, who both died in 1268. During her first marriage to Guigues VII, Dauphin de Vienne, Count d’Albon, she became known as "The Grande Dauphine". After his death in 1261, she married Gaston VII Viscount dei Béarn (1225 -90). In 1309 she renounced her claims on the County of Savoy. She lived (1237-1310).

1369/73-82 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Bourbon of Lyonnais et Forez   
In 1350 she married king Charles V of France (1338-64-80), . His reign was marred by the Hundred Years' War, but Charles' army scored some victories and defeated the army of the King of Navarre. He declined to be drawn into a crusade. Nonetheless, dissatisfaction with his rule was such that at one point the Mayor of Paris, Etienne Marcel, led a revolt against Charles that forced the king to flee the city. A strong supporter of the arts, Charles had the Louvre restored and improved and in 1367 created the first royal library in France. Mother of three children, and lived (1338-78).

1375-93 Sovereign Countess Blanche de France of Valois  
Succeeded husband Philippe (1344-75). She was daughter of King Charles IV, and lived (1328-92).

1376-1443 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Comminges   
Married to Count Jean III d'Armagnac.

1382-1416 Sovereign Countess Anne d'Auvergne of Lyonnais et Forez   
Married to Louis II duc de Bourbon, Count de Forez and Prince de Dombes (1337-1410). 

1384-1405 Sovereign Countess Marguerite III de Mâle of Flanders, Artois and Franche-Comté, Nevers and Rethel, Marchioness d'Anvers, Dame of Antwerpen, Mechelen and Malines (Belgium and France)
1404 Sovereign Duchess of Brabant and Limburg
Also known as Margaretha, she was daughter of Louis de Male of Flanders - she inherited his lands and those of her grandmother, Marguerite de France, Countess of Bourgogne and Artois, and first married to Philippe le Hardi de Rouveres, Duke de Bourgogne, who died after 6 months. Her second husband was Philippe, Duke de Bourbon, and she became famous as patron of fashion, art and articrafts. She inherited Brabant and Limburg after the abdication of her aunt, Johanna. Margaretha lived (1350-1405).

1386-1416 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Vaudemont, Dame de Joinville   
Succeeded father, Henri V de Vaudemont. Her mother was Marie de Ligny, de Houdanc.

1392-1419 Regent Queen Isabeau Baverie of France
1403-04 President of the Council of State 
In 1392 her husband, Charles IV had the first of 44 fits of insanity, which were to last until his death in 1422, and would make him unable to reign. Isabeau was given large lands in Normandie, around Paris and in Champagne as a security, and officially declared regent during the "absence" of her husband. From 1395 she actively engaged in politics, and arranged the marriage of her children in very young age. Her advisors, the brother's of her husband, Philippe de Burgundy and d'Orléans, engaged in a fierce power struggle, which almost resulted in a civil war. In 1402 she took over the control of the taxation and at 26.4.1403 she became President of the Council of State and took over the management of the Government. One year later Louis died, and she reigned jointly with Philippe. After the birth of the last child, she removed totally from Charles, who became more and more violent and dangerous. In 1407 her position was reaffirmed in an official act, but her husband's cousin, Jean placed his followers in all the central positions. 1411-12 a civil war broke out between the Burundians and Orleans. In 1415 her 18 year old son, Louis, took over the government, and soon after the English attacked France. After Louis' death, his brother, Jean (Married to Jakobäa of Hainault, Holland and Zeeland) was regent until his death two years later. She then was in charge again, and appointed Jean without Fear as Governor of the French Kingdom. In 1419 and 1420 she met the English king, Henry V and negotiated a peace-treaty. After the death of her husband, she lived alone, plagued by rheumatism and immobile because of her heavy weight. Originally named Elisabeth von Bayern, she was mother of 12 children, and lived (1370-1435).

1392/95 Sovereign VicountessAlix of Dreux   
She succeeded her father, Etienne Gavin I, Seigneur de Bossart, Vicomte de Dreux (1330-92) and married to Mace de Gemges. She lived (1364-94).

1393-1417 Sovereign Countess Marie de Baux of Orange  
Succeeded father Raymond IV and joint ruler with husband, Jean I de Chalons-Arlay, who died of the Plague in Paris. Succeeded by son Louis II de Chalon).

1394-1406 Sovereign Countess Blanche of Dammartin   
Daughter of Charles, Count of Dammartin, who died after 1368, and Jeanne, Viscomtesse de Chateaudun, and married Charles Bureau, Seigneur de la Riviere, who died 1429.

1394-1422/24 Sovereign Countess Jeanne II d'Auvergne and Boulogne  
Succeeded father Jean and reigned jointly with husband, Duke Jean de Berry and after his death in 1416 with George de la Trémoylle, Baron de Sully. She was succeeded by daughter, Marie, and lived (1378-1422/24).

1397-1443 Sovereign Countess Henriette of Montbeliard  
1419-26 Regent Dowager Countess of Württemberg (Germany)
Succeeded father as Countess of Montbeliard or Möpelgard in Burgundy. After the death of her husband, count Eberhard V, she was regent for son Ulrich. She lived (1387-1444).

1397-1404 Sovereign Countess Marie de Coucy, Soissons and Marle   
Oldest daughter of Count Enguerrand VII, she sold the territory to Duke Louis d'Orleans and might have been murdered. Her only son with her late husband, Heinrich, Hereditary Count of Bar, Robert, died in 1415 and trough his daughter, the territory went to the House of Luxembourg-Ligny. Marie lived (1366-1411).

1398-1412 Sovereign Countess Isabelle of Foix-Beárn and Co-Princess of Andorra, Viscomtesse de Castellbo (etc), de Marsan, du Gévaydan et de Lautrec (France and Spain)
Succeeded brother, Mathieu V de Castelbon, and ruled jointly with husband, Archambaud de Grailli, and was succeeded by son, Jean in 1411 or 12.

1399-1402 Regent Dowager Duchess Juana de Navarra of Bretagne  
After Jean IV's death, she was regent for son Jean V until she married king Henry IV of England as his third wife and became known as Joan of Navarra. She lived (circa 1373-1437).

Around 1400-42 Titular Queen  Yolande de Aragón of Sicily, Napoli, Jerusalem, and Aragón (Italy)
1417 Regent Dowager Duchess of Anjou and Provence  
1424-27 President of the Estate Generals of Anjou and Provence
Daughter of Juan I, king of Aragón, she was initially called Violenta. Her father was succeeded by Martin as king of Aragón. Her marriage to Louis II of Anjou in 1400, who spent much of his life fighting in Italy for his claim to the kingdom of Napoli. She was appointed guardian of her son-in-law the Dauphin Charles who became Charles VII in 1422, but his title was still challenged by the English and their Burgundian allies. In this struggle, Yolande maneuvered to have the duke of Bretagne break from an alliance with the English, and was responsible for the Breton soldier, Arthur de Richemont, becoming the constable of France in 1425. Yolande's early and strong support of Jeanne d'Arc, when others had reasonable doubts, suggests the Duchess' possible larger role in the orchestrating the Maid's appearance on the scene. Her younger daughter, Yolanda, was married to the heir of Bretagne, her youngest son René inherited Lorraine in 1431 and after her older son's Louis III's death, and three years later he also became duke of Anjou and heir of Sicily. She lived (1379-1442).

1400-34 Sovereign Countess Marie d'Anjou of Auvergne  
1414-34 Regent  of Bourbon
1416 Sovereign Duchess de Montpensier
She was daughter of Jean d'Anjou, Count de Poitiers, Duc de Berry, d'Auvergne and Jeanne d'Armagnac, and was married to Louis de Châtillon, Count de Dunois, Philippe d'Artois, Count d'Eu and finally to Jean I, Duc de Bourbon (1410-15-34), and regent during his imprisonment in England. He was succeeded by his son, Charles I (1401-34-56). She lived (1367-1434).

1402-08 Sovereign Lady Valentina Visconti of Asti (Italy)
1407-08 (†) Regent Dowager Duchess of Orlèans and the Counties of Valois, Blois, Dunois, Angoulemême, Périgord, Dreux and Soissons  
After her husband, Louis d'Orléans, Duke d'Orleans etc. was assassinated on the command of the Duke of Burgundy she became guardian of her children and took over the fiefs of her husband. She became the leader of the Orlèan-party and worked for the rehabilitation of her husband. Daughter of Duke Gian Galeazzo I of Milano, Lord of Pavia, Novara, Como, Vercelli, Alba, Asti, Tortona, Alessandria e Vigevano (1355-1402) and Princess Isabella de Valois of France and mother of eight children. She lived (1366-1408).

1402-25 Sovereign Countess Bonne d'Artois of Auxerre, d'Eu, de Mâcon, de Vermandois, d'Amiens et de Ponthieu  
1422-25 Countess de Boulogne
Succeeded Jean, Duke of Touraine, Dauphin de Viennous, Duke de Berry, Cunt of Poitiers and Ponthieu. She was the second wife of Philippe de Bourgogne, Count of Nevers and Rethel. She lived (1393-1425).

1403-19 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Sancerre  
Daughter of Jean III and Marguerite, Dame de Marmande. Married Gerard VI Chabot, Baron de Retz (d. circa 1364), Beraud II Dauphin d'Auvergne, Cte de Clermont (d. 1400), Jean de Saligny, Constable of Naples and Jacques de Montberon, Baron de Maulevrier (d. 1422).

Until 1407 Chatelaine Jeanne of Luxembourg of Saint Pôl and Ligny, de Lille   
Daughter of Count Valeran III de Luxembourg-St-Pôl (1355-1415) and Lady Maud Holland (Half sister of King Richard II of England). Married to Antoine de Bourgogne, Duke of Brabant and Limbourg (d. 1415), and their son, Philippe succeeded her father as count.

1409-15 Vice-Reine Blanca de Navarra of Sicilia (Italy)
1425-41 Queen Regnant Blanca I Navarra, Countess de Nemours and Everux  (Spain and France)
She was widow of Martin I de Aragón (1392-1409). His first wife was Maria of Sicilia, Duchess of Athens and he was succeeded by his father, Martin II (1409-10). 1410-12 the throne of Aragon was vacant, until Federico I de Aragon became king. Blanca lived (1385-1441). She was daughter of Charles II of Navarra, Comte d'Èvreux and Duc de Nemours, and secondly married to Juan II of Aragon, who succeeded her, and after his death in 1479 her daughter, Leonor became Queen. Blanca lived (1391-1441).

1412-25 Regent Dowager Countess Catherine d'Alençon of Mortain   
After the death of her husband, Pierre de Navarre, she was regent for Louis I, dauphin de Viennois, Duc de Guyenne, Comte de Mortain. In 1413 she married Louis II de Bavière, Duke of Bavaria, Count Palatine of the Rhine, who also became count of Mortain.

1415-68 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Bar of Soissons, Marle and Coucy  
Granddaughter of Marie de Coucy (1366-1405), who was the granddaughter of King Edward III of England, who was heiress of Soissons and most of the Coucy's French estates. Her father, Robert, Count de Marle et de Soissons, was killed in battle in 1415. Her mother was Jeanne de Bethune (†1450) and she married Louis de Luxembourg, Count de Ligny (1418-75) and lived (1415-62).

From 1415 Regent Dowager Countess Marie de Bretagne of Alençon  
Widow of Pierre II le Noble and regent for son Jean V le Beau (1409-15-75-76). Marie lived (1391-1446). 

1417-28 Sovereign Duchess and Countess Jacobäa von Bayern of Holland, Zeeland and Hainault, Lady of Friesland and Countess of Ponthieu (The Netherlands and France)
1428-33 Titular Countess
She was the only child of Willem VI of Bayern-Straubing and Hainault-Holland. In 1415 she married the French Dauphin, Jean de Touraine, who died 1417. The following year she got papal acceptance to marry her cousin Jean IV of Brabant. With the support of Emperor Sigismund of Germany, her uncle, Johan VI of Bavaria demanded that she accepted him as regent. He persuaded the Pope to withdraw the dispensation and gave her lands to him. In 1419 Philippe of Bourgogne intervened. Johan got parts of southern Holland. The next year her husband gave Holland, Zeeland and Hainault as security to Johan. She die not accept this and had the marriage annulled. In 1422 she married Humphrey of Gloucester and in 1424 they launched an attack on her ex-husband. In 1424 she was taken prisoner and the following year her uncle died. He had given the countries to Philippe of Bourgogne. Jacobäa escaped and fought against Philippe until 1428 until she had to capitulate. In 1432 she married Frank van Borsele and the next year she abdicated. She died of tuberculosis and lived (1401-36). 

1417-20 Sovereign Countess Elénore of Touraine  
Succeeded brother, Raymond Louis de Beaufort. She was succeeded by her cousin Amanieu, who was first succeeded by his brother and in 1444 by niece, Anne. 

1420-36 Sovereign Countess Marie of Dammartin   
Married to Reynald V of Nanteuil-Aci, and succeeded by daughter, Marguerite.

1422/24-34 Sovereign Countess Marie de Berry of Auvergne  
1422 Sovereign Countess of Boulogne
Succeeded mother, Jeanne II, and was succeeded by husband, Bertrand I de la Tour and then by son, Bertrand II. She lived (1370-1434).

Until 1425 Sovereign Viscomtesse Marie Chamillart of Beaumont au Maine  
She married Pierre d'Alençon, Comte du Perche and d'Alençon.

1426-30 Army Leader Joan d'Arc  
As a teenager, Joan believed she heard the voices of angels telling her to help the future Charles VII, who had been deprived of his inheritance by the English and the Burgundians, to regain his throne. Charles sent her to raise the siege at Orlèans, which she did successfully, driving the English from the city and allowing him to be crowned at Rheims. She was soon captured by Burgundians and sold to the English, who found her guilty of witchcraft and wearing a man's clothes. She was burned at the stake in 1431 and canonized in 1920. She lived (1412-31)

1426-36 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Clermont-en-Auvergne and Sancerre and Dauphine of Auvergne  
Daughter of Berauld III, count of Clermont and Boulogne and Gabrielle de la Tour, Heiress of Auvergne. She married Louis de Bourbon, who was count of Clermont, Sancerre and Montpensier. No children.

1430-71 Politically Influential Duchess Isabelle de Portugal of Bourgogne    
As the third wife of Duke Philippe of Burgundy (1396-1467), she exercised power in the very wearied domains of her husband. She acted as regent in his absence, was in charge of the finances, negotiated treaties and initiated reforms of religious orders. Daughter of King João I of Portugal and Philippa de Gent and mother of Duke Karl (1433-1477) (The father of Duchess Maria of Burgundy).

1430-31 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl of Saint-Pôl and Ligny and Dame de Roussy  
The daughter of Countess Mahaut (1335-60-78) she succeeded her grand-nephew, Philippe, who was son of the Hereditary Countess Jeanne (d. 1407), daughter of Waléran III (d. 1415). Jeanne (d. 1431).

1431-53 Sovereign Duchess Isabella of Haut-Lorraine and Bar (France and Belgium)
1435-38 Regent Queen of Napoli (Italy)
She succeeded her father Karl I as Duchess of Lorraine. Her husband, René d'Anjou (d. 1480), Duke of Anjou from 1430 was Duke by the right of his wife of Bar from 1434, and when Queen Giovanna of Napoli died in 1435, she left him her throne. Isabella led the government during his warfare with Giovanna's privious adopted heir King Alfonso of Aragón and Sicily and in 1442 he defeated René, took Naples, and the following year he was recognized as King by the Pope Eugene IV. Among Isabella's six children was Queen Margaret d'Anjou of England. Isabel lived (1410-1453).

1438-62 Sovereign Duchess Eléonore de Bourbon-La Marche of Nemours, Countess of Castres and La Marche    
Daughter of Jacques de Bourbon-La Marche (1370-1438) and Beatrix d'Evreux, the daughter of Carlos III of Navarra. Her father's second wife was Giovanna II of Napoli. Eleonore married to Bernard d'Armagnac, Count de Pardiac. 

Until 1442 Sovereign Duchess Marguerite de Bourgogne of Guyenne  
Daughter of Jean de Bourgogne, Duc de G. and Margareta of Bavaria. She was first married to Louis de France (1397-1415) and then to Arthur III de Montfort of Bretagne (193-1458).

1444-(90) Sovereign Countess Agnes de Touraine  
Succeeded brother, Pierre. Her husband Agne de la Tour, was count by the right of his wife (1445-90).

Around 1400-42 Titular Queen  Yolande de Aragón of Sicily, Napoli, Jerusalem, and Aragón (Italy)
1417 Regent Dowager Duchess of Anjou and Provence  
1424-27 President of the Estate Generals of Anjou and Provence
Daughter of Juan I, king of Aragón, she was initially called Violenta. Her father was succeeded by Martin as king of Aragón. Her marriage to Louis II of Anjou in 1400, who spent much of his life fighting in Italy for his claim to the kingdom of Napoli. She was appointed guardian of her son-in-law the Dauphin Charles who became Charles VII in 1422, but his title was still challenged by the English and their Burgundian allies. In this struggle, Yolande maneuvered to have the duke of Bretagne break from an alliance with the English, and was responsible for the Breton soldier, Arthur de Richemont, becoming the constable of France in 1425. Yolande's early and strong support of Jeanne d'Arc, when others had reasonable doubts, suggests the Duchess' possible larger role in the orchestrating the Maid's appearance on the scene. Her younger daughter, Yolanda, was married to the heir of Bretagne, her youngest son René inherited Lorraine in 1431 and after her older son's Louis III's death, and three years later he also became duke of Anjou and heir of Sicily. She lived (1379-1442).

1400-34 Sovereign Countess Marie d'Anjou of Auvergne  
1414-34 Regent  of Bourbon
1416 Sovereign Duchess de Montpensier
She was daughter of Jean d'Anjou, Count de Poitiers, Duc de Berry, d'Auvergne and Jeanne d'Armagnac, and was married to Louis de Châtillon, Count de Dunois, Philippe d'Artois, Count d'Eu and finally to Jean I, Duc de Bourbon (1410-15-34), and regent during his imprisonment in England. He was succeeded by his son, Charles I (1401-34-56). She lived (1367-1434).

1402-08 Sovereign Lady Valentina Visconti of Asti (Italy)
1407-08 (†) Regent Dowager Duchess of Orlèans and the Counties of Valois, Blois, Dunois, Angoulemême, Périgord, Dreux and Soissons  
After her husband, Louis d'Orléans, Duke d'Orleans etc. was assassinated on the command of the Duke of Burgundy she became guardian of her children and took over the fiefs of her husband. She became the leader of the Orlèan-party and worked for the rehabilitation of her husband. Daughter of Duke Gian Galeazzo I of Milano, Lord of Pavia, Novara, Como, Vercelli, Alba, Asti, Tortona, Alessandria e Vigevano (1355-1402) and Princess Isabella de Valois of France and mother of eight children. She lived (1366-1408).

1402-25 Sovereign Countess Bonne d'Artois of Auxerre, d'Eu, de Mâcon, de Vermandois, d'Amiens et de Ponthieu  
1422-25 Countess de Boulogne
Succeeded Jean, Duke of Touraine, Dauphin de Viennous, Duke de Berry, Cunt of Poitiers and Ponthieu. She was the second wife of Philippe de Bourgogne, Count of Nevers and Rethel. She lived (1393-1425).

1403-19 Sovereign Countess Marguerite of Sancerre  
Daughter of Jean III and Marguerite, Dame de Marmande. Married Gerard VI Chabot, Baron de Retz (d. circa 1364), Beraud II Dauphin d'Auvergne, Cte de Clermont (d. 1400), Jean de Saligny, Constable of Naples and Jacques de Montberon, Baron de Maulevrier (d. 1422).

Until 1407 Chatelaine Jeanne of Luxembourg of Saint Pôl and Ligny, de Lille   
Daughter of Count Valeran III de Luxembourg-St-Pôl (1355-1415) and Lady Maud Holland (Half sister of King Richard II of England). Married to Antoine de Bourgogne, Duke of Brabant and Limbourg (d. 1415), and their son, Philippe succeeded her father as count.

1409-15 Vice-Reine Blanca de Navarra of Sicilia (Italy)
1425-41 Queen Regnant Blanca I Navarra, Countess de Nemours and Everux  (Spain and France)
She was widow of Martin I de Aragón (1392-1409). His first wife was Maria of Sicilia, Duchess of Athens and he was succeeded by his father, Martin II (1409-10). 1410-12 the throne of Aragon was vacant, until Federico I de Aragon became king. Blanca lived (1385-1441). She was daughter of Charles II of Navarra, Comte d'Èvreux and Duc de Nemours, and secondly married to Juan II of Aragon, who succeeded her, and after his death in 1479 her daughter, Leonor became Queen. Blanca lived (1391-1441).

1412-25 Regent Dowager Countess Catherine d'Alençon of Mortain   
After the death of her husband, Pierre de Navarre, she was regent for Louis I, dauphin de Viennois, Duc de Guyenne, Comte de Mortain. In 1413 she married Louis II de Bavière, Duke of Bavaria, Count Palatine of the Rhine, who also became count of Mortain.

1415-68 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Bar of Soissons, Marle and Coucy  
Granddaughter of Marie de Coucy (1366-1405), who was the granddaughter of King Edward III of England, who was heiress of Soissons and most of the Coucy's French estates. Her father, Robert, Count de Marle et de Soissons, was killed in battle in 1415. Her mother was Jeanne de Bethune (†1450) and she married Louis de Luxembourg, Count de Ligny (1418-75) and lived (1415-62).

From 1415 Regent Dowager Countess Marie de Bretagne of Alençon  
Widow of Pierre II le Noble and regent for son Jean V le Beau (1409-15-75-76). Marie lived (1391-1446). 

1417-28 Sovereign Duchess and Countess Jacobäa von Bayern of Holland, Zeeland and Hainault, Lady of Friesland and Countess of Ponthieu (The Netherlands and France)
1428-33 Titular Countess
She was the only child of Willem VI of Bayern-Straubing and Hainault-Holland. In 1415 she married the French Dauphin, Jean de Touraine, who died 1417. The following year she got papal acceptance to marry her cousin Jean IV of Brabant. With the support of Emperor Sigismund of Germany, her uncle, Johan VI of Bavaria demanded that she accepted him as regent. He persuaded the Pope to withdraw the dispensation and gave her lands to him. In 1419 Philippe of Bourgogne intervened. Johan got parts of southern Holland. The next year her husband gave Holland, Zeeland and Hainault as security to Johan. She die not accept this and had the marriage annulled. In 1422 she married Humphrey of Gloucester and in 1424 they launched an attack on her ex-husband. In 1424 she was taken prisoner and the following year her uncle died. He had given the countries to Philippe of Bourgogne. Jacobäa escaped and fought against Philippe until 1428 until she had to capitulate. In 1432 she married Frank van Borsele and the next year she abdicated. She died of tuberculosis and lived (1401-36). 

1417-20 Sovereign Countess Elénore of Touraine  
Succeeded brother, Raymond Louis de Beaufort. She was succeeded by her cousin Amanieu, who was first succeeded by his brother and in 1444 by niece, Anne. 

1420-36 Sovereign Countess Marie of Dammartin   
Married to Reynald V of Nanteuil-Aci, and succeeded by daughter, Marguerite.

1422/24-34 Sovereign Countess Marie de Berry of Auvergne  
1422 Sovereign Countess of Boulogne
Succeeded mother, Jeanne II, and was succeeded by husband, Bertrand I de la Tour and then by son, Bertrand II. She lived (1370-1434).

Until 1425 Sovereign Viscomtesse Marie Chamillart of Beaumont au Maine  
She married Pierre d'Alençon, Comte du Perche and d'Alençon.

1426-30 Army Leader Joan d'Arc  
As a teenager, Joan believed she heard the voices of angels telling her to help the future Charles VII, who had been deprived of his inheritance by the English and the Burgundians, to regain his throne. Charles sent her to raise the siege at Orlèans, which she did successfully, driving the English from the city and allowing him to be crowned at Rheims. She was soon captured by Burgundians and sold to the English, who found her guilty of witchcraft and wearing a man's clothes. She was burned at the stake in 1431 and canonized in 1920. She lived (1412-31)

1426-36 Sovereign Countess Jeanne of Clermont-en-Auvergne and Sancerre and Dauphine of Auvergne  
Daughter of Berauld III, count of Clermont and Boulogne and Gabrielle de la Tour, Heiress of Auvergne. She married Louis de Bourbon, who was count of Clermont, Sancerre and Montpensier. No children.

1430-71 Politically Influential Duchess Isabelle de Portugal of Bourgogne    
As the third wife of Duke Philippe of Burgundy (1396-1467), she exercised power in the very wearied domains of her husband. She acted as regent in his absence, was in charge of the finances, negotiated treaties and initiated reforms of religious orders. Daughter of King João I of Portugal and Philippa de Gent and mother of Duke Karl (1433-1477) (The father of Duchess Maria of Burgundy).

1430-31 Sovereign Countess Jeanne de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl of Saint-Pôl and Ligny and Dame de Roussy  
The daughter of Countess Mahaut (1335-60-78) she succeeded her grand-nephew, Philippe, who was son of the Hereditary Countess Jeanne (d. 1407), daughter of Waléran III (d. 1415). Jeanne (d. 1431).

1431-53 Sovereign Duchess Isabella of Haut-Lorraine and Bar (France and Belgium)
1435-38 Regent Queen of Napoli (Italy)
She succeeded her father Karl I as Duchess of Lorraine. Her husband, René d'Anjou (d. 1480), Duke of Anjou from 1430 was Duke by the right of his wife of Bar from 1434, and when Queen Giovanna of Napoli died in 1435, she left him her throne. Isabella led the government during his warfare with Giovanna's privious adopted heir King Alfonso of Aragón and Sicily and in 1442 he defeated René, took Naples, and the following year he was recognized as King by the Pope Eugene IV. Among Isabella's six children was Queen Margaret d'Anjou of England. Isabel lived (1410-1453).

1438-62 Sovereign Duchess Eléonore de Bourbon-La Marche of Nemours, Countess of Castres and La Marche    
Daughter of Jacques de Bourbon-La Marche (1370-1438) and Beatrix d'Evreux, the daughter of Carlos III of Navarra. Her father's second wife was Giovanna II of Napoli. Eleonore married to Bernard d'Armagnac, Count de Pardiac. 

Until 1442 Sovereign Duchess Marguerite de Bourgogne of Guyenne  
Daughter of Jean de Bourgogne, Duc de G. and Margareta of Bavaria. She was first married to Louis de France (1397-1415) and then to Arthur III de Montfort of Bretagne (193-1458).

1444-(90) Sovereign Countess Agnes de Touraine  
Succeeded brother, Pierre. Her husband Agne de la Tour, was count by the right of his wife (1445-90).

1452-76 Sovereign Countess Marie of Aumale  
Succeeded father Jean V and was succeeded by grandson, Rene de Vaudemont, Duke de Lorraine. 

1452-83 Sovereign Countess Elisabeth of Eu and Nevers  
She succeeded brother, Philippe, and married Jean de Clèves.

1455-81 Sovereign Countess Françoise of Limoges and Périgord, Viscomtesse de Lomage and Dame d'Avesness  
Daughter of Isabelle, who reigned 1317-28 and succeeded father Gui VIII de Penthièvre. Married to Alain Le Grand, Seigneur d'Albert etc, was joint ruler 1470-1522. Françoise (d. 1481).

1464-79 Baroness Regant Catherine de Coarraze of Coarraze and Aspet  
She succeeded her father, Catherine. At that time her husband, Count Mathieu de Foix had been dead for 11 years. Her reign was troubled by family feuds, and in 1479 she lost the Castle and Barony of Coarraze and withdrew to Aspet. Ruined by the feuds she sold the barony to  Jean de Foix, vicomte de Narbonne in 1483. Sad and maltreated she sought refuge at he Castle of Durfort in the village of Galey in Couserans. The mother of two daughters, she lived (1431-92).

Until 1466  Sovereign Countess Marguerite d'Orléans Vertus-en-Champagne  
Daughter of Louis de France, Duc de Touraine, d'Orléans etc., and married Richard de Bretagne, comte Étampes. She lived (1406-66).

1470-82 Regent Princess Madeleine de France of Andorra and Foix-Beárn  
1479-83 and 1483-84 Regent of Navarra (Spain)
She was regent for Francesco in Foix-Beárn and Andorra 1470-83 after her husband, Count Gaston V's death. In 1479 her son succeeded his paternal grandmother in Navarra. Madeleine was daughter of Charles VII of France and Isabeau of Bavaria and lived (1443-86).

Until 1472 Sovereign Countess Isabelle de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl of Guise   
She married Charles d'Anjou, Duc de Maine, whose first wife was Corbella Ruffo, Contessa di Montalto e di Corigliano (d. 1442), Isabelle was mother of one daughter, Louise (1445-77), who was married to Jacques, Comte d'Armangnac and Duc de Nemours. 

1473-83 Sovereign Duchess Yolande of Lorraine and Bar, Countess d'Alsace   
1481-83 Titular Queen of Sicily, Sardegna and Jerusalem 
Daughter of Jean II (1425-70), Duc de Lorraine, Titular King of Napoli and Claimant to Aragón by his grandmother, Yolanda de Aragón, and successor of her brother, Nicolai. Married to Frederich de Lorraine, Comte de Vaudémont, who died in 1470 and Ferri II de Guise, who was Duke by the right of his wife, and was succeeded by her son, René II de Vaudémont. She lived (1428-83).

1477-82 Maria de Bourgogne, by the Grace of God, Duchess Burgundy, Lorraine, Gelders, Limburg, Jülich, Brabant, Quilon, Bar and Franche-Comté, Margravine of the Holy Roman Empire of Higher-Elsass, Breisgau, Lower-Elsass and Antwerpen, Countess of Flanderes, Hainaut, d'Artois, Boulonge, Namur, Pouthieu, Picardie, d'Eu, Vermandôis, Charolais, Macon, Montbeliard, Zutphern, Nevers and Rethel and Baroness d'Ilês, Bar-sur-Seine, Lady of Friesland, Salins and of Mechelen etc (France and Belgium)
At her father’s death in January 1477, Louis XI of France seized Burgundy and Picardy and prepared to her entire inheritance. To gain the assistance of Flanders, Brabant, Hainaut, and Holland, whose representatives met at Ghent in Febuary 1477, Mary granted the Great Privilege, which restored the liberties of the provincial estates that her father and grandfather had abrogated. She then rejected Louis XI’s proposal that she marry the dauphin Charles, and in May she married Maximilian, who had hastened to her assistance with an army. However, the Low Countries remained in turmoil; despite his victory at Guinegate  in 1479, and after Maria's death Maximilian was forced to agree to the Treaty of Arras, by which Franche-Comté and Artois passed to France. Mary’s premature death, caused by a fall from horseback, left her young son Philip (later Philip I of Castile) her heir, but only in 1493 was Maximilian able to regain control over the Low Countries, where Philip had been a virtual prisoner until 1485. The Treaty of Senlis  in 1493 with France restored Artois and Franche-Comté to Philip, but Burgundy and Picardy remained French. Mary of Burgundy had several, and  lived (1457-82).

1482-1503 Joint Regent Dowager Duchess Margaret of York of Bourgogne   
She acted as de-facto joint regent with her son-in-law Maximillian von Habsburg, who was Holy Roman Emperor after the death of her stepdaughter, Duchess Maria. Margaret was the third wife and widow of Charles Le Hardi, who died 1477, and lived (1446-1503).

1482-1546  Sovereign Countess Marie de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl of Saint Pôl, Ligny, de Marle, Soissons and Conversano, Dame de Condé, Bohaim and Ham  
She was daughter of Count Pierre II de Saint Pôl, Soissons, Brienne, Roussy and Marle and Margaritha of Savoia. First married to Jacques de Romont and secondly to François de Bourbon, Count of Vendôme. Her oldest son was Charles, Duke of Vendôme, Count of Chartres and Soissons, Marle and La Fere and Lord of Mondoubleau, the second son was François I de Bourbon-Saint-Pôl, Duke of Estouteville, Count of St.-Pol. who died in 1545 and was succeeded by his son, François II, who died after one year and was succeeded by his sister Marie de Bourbon-Saint-Pôl. Marie de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl lived (1472-546).

Circa 1483-1506 Sovereign Countess Charlotte de Bourgogne of Rethel   
Succeeded mother, and was married to Jean d'Albert, Seigneur d'Orval, and was succeeded by daughter, Maria.

Until 1487 Dame Jeanne de Bourbon of Rochefort   
Daughter of king Jean II de Bourbon, Count de Vendôme etc. and Isabelle de Beauvau, Dame de La Roche-sur-Yon (1436-74), and married to Louis de Joyeuse, Count de Grand-Pré. She lived (1460-87).

1488-1514 Sovereign Duchess Anne of Bretagne  
Anne de Dreux Montfort became Duchess at the age of 11, just after her land had been invaded by French troops who demanded that she should not marry without the consent of the crown. Afraid that Bretagne would be absorbed into France, she made an alliance with Maximilian of Austria (whom she married by proxy in 1490), Henry VII of England and Ferdinand II of Aragon, but eventually, after a long siege, she was forced to marry the French king Charles VIII in 1491. After he died without an heir in 1498, Anne had to marry his successor Louis XII. But she insisted that Bretagne should form a separate part of the inheritance, going to a second son or daughter, or to her own heirs. Anne was a great patron of scholars, poets and artists, and lived (1476-1514).

1491-1500 Sovereign Countess Charlotte de Bourgogne of Rethel   
Succeeded father, Count Jean de Nevers, de Rethel, d'Etampes et d'Eu (1415-91). Her sister, Elisabeth de Rethel, was heiress of  Nevers and Eu, but died 1483 - she was married to Johann I of Cleves. Charlotte married Jean d'Albret, Seigneur d'Orval (d. .1524) and was succeeded by daughter Maria d'Albert de Rethel.Charlotte lived (1472-1500).

1496-1515 Sovereign Countess Louise de Savoie of Angoulême 
1515-31 Sovereign Duchess d'Angoulême, Nemours, d'Auvergne, Bourbonnais et Châtellerault, Comtesse du Maine, de Beaufort, Clermont-en-Beauvaisis et Gien 
1516-31 Sovereign Duchess d'Anjou 
1523-27 Sovereign Duchess de Bourbon
1525-26 Regent of France
1528 Sovereign Duchess de Touraine  
Daughter of Philippe II de Savoie and Marguerite de Bourbon, married to Charles d'Orléans, and succeeded him as Duchess of Angoulême and d'Anjou. She was very influential during the reign of her son, King François I of France, and during his absence in the Italian Wars, she acted as regent, and during his captivity in Spain 1525–26 she made an alliance with King Henry VIII of England, in which Henry deserted his alliance with Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, François' opponent in the Italian Wars. In 1529 she also negotiated the so-called Ladies’ Peace with Margaret of Austria, Charles V’s aunt. Louise lived (1476-1531).

1496-1539 Sovereign Countess Louise de Bourbon of Montpensier, Princesse des Dombes, Dauphine d'Auvergne  
1530-61 Countess de Mortain
1538-61 Duchesse d'Auvergne 
1539-61 Duchesse de Montpensier
Daughter of Gilbert de Bourbon, Comte de Montpensier, Dauphin d'Auvergne, archduke de Sessa, Vice-roi de Napoli (1443-99) and Claire de Gonzaga of Mantua. First married to André de Chauvigny and then to Louis de Bourbon, prince de la Roche-sur-Yon. She lived (1482-1561).

1498-1505 Sovereign Duchess Jeanne of Berry  
Daughter of King Louis IX and Charlotte de Savoie. Married to Louis II, Duc d'Orléans and later King Louis XII of France. They divorced in 1498 and she retired to Bourges, where she founded a convent. In 1950 she was canonized as Sainte Jeanne de France. She lived (1464-1505). 

1500/24-40 Sovereign Countess Maria d'Albert of Rethel (Belgium)
She succeeded her mother, Charlotte de Bourgogne, as Countess of Rethel - possibly not until after her father Jean d'Albret's death in 1524. She was married to Charles of Clèves, Count de Nevers (d. 1521) and succeeded by son, François de Nevers et Rethel, Duke of de Nevers (d. 1561) who was succeeded by his daughters Henriette de Clève as Duchess of Nevers-Rethel, Catherine de Nevers (1548-1633) as Countess d'Eu and Marie de Nevers (1553- -1574) as Comtesse de Beaufort. Maria lived (1491-1549).

After 1500-49 Sovereign Countess Louise Borgia of Valentinos, Dame of La Mothe-Feuilly, Vaires and Neves  
Daughter of Cecare Borgia and in 1517 married to Louis II de La Trémoille, vicomte de Thouars, who was killed in 1525. Five years later she married Philippe de Bourbon-Busset, seigneur de Busset (d. 1557). She lived (1500-53).

From 1500 Sovereign Countess Anne de Chabannes of Dammartin  
Daughter of Jean VII de Chabannes, Count of Dammartin.

1501-24 Sovereign Countess Anne of Auvergne  
Succeeded father, Jean III and was succeeded by sister Madeleine. 

1501-20 Sovereign Countess Jeanne d'Orléans of Bar-sur-Seine  
Daughter of Antoniette de Polignac and the king of France. She was legitimized by her marriage to Jean Aubin, Seigneur de Malicorne. She secondly married Jean de Longwy, Baron de Pagny.  

1503-22 Sovereign Duchess Suzane de Bourbon of Bourbon, Bourbonnais and Auvergne  
Daughter of Pierre III de Bourbon de Beajeau and the former regent of France, Anne de France, Viscomtesse de Thouars who was initially regent in Bourbon.  Suzane married to Charles III de Bourbon-Montpensier, Duke of Bourbonnais, and lived (1491-1522).

1512-16 Sovereign Duchess Germaine de Foix of Nemours, Countess of Foix-Béarn  
1526-37 Vice-reine of Valencia and Lieutenant General  
Known in Spain as Germana, she was the daughter of Count Jean de Foix, d'Etampes and Vicomte de Narbonne and Marie d'Orleans, she succeeded her brother, Gaston. She was married to Fernando II the Catholic of Aragon as his second wife after the death of Queen Isabel I. They engaged in a power struggle over her lands until his death in 1516. Three years later she married Johan von Brandenburg-Ansbach (d. 1525) one year after his death she married Fernando d'Aragon, Duca di Calabria (d. 1550) and they were appointed Virreina and Virrey of Valencia. She did not have any children, and lived (1490-1537).

1512-15 Sovereign Duchess Françoise of Longueville, Countess of Montgomery and Tancarville    
Natural daughter of Daughter of king François II of France, and married to the Viscount de Melun, who died 1512. 

Until 1513 Sovereign Countess Claudine de Brosse of Penthièvre  
Succeeded Jean II de Brosse, Count of Penthièvre. 

1514-24 Sovereign Duchess Claude de France of Bretagne, Countess d'Étampes 
1514-17 Sovereign Duchess of Berry  
She succeeded her mother and was married to King François I of France. She lived (1499-1524).

1515-75 Sovereign Duchess Renée de France of Chartres, Countess of Gisoirs et de Montargis   
Daughter of Louis XII and Duchess Anne de Bretagne, sister of Duchess Claude of Bretagne, and married to Hercule II d'Este, duc de Ferrare. She lived (1510-75).

1515-50 Sovereign Princess Isabelle-Louise de Bourbon of Carency   
Her brother, Betrand died in 1515 as the last male of the family. She married François de Pérusse des Cars.

1515-24  Sovereign Duchess Philiberta di Savoia of Nemours   
She and her husband, Giuliano de Medici, had been created joint holders of the duchy. In 1524 Louise de Savoie was created Duchess. She lived (1498-1524).


1516-20 Sovereign Duchess Jeanne d'Orléans of Valois  
Granddaughter of Louis d'Orléans (1392-1407) the son of King Charles V of France. She succeeded her relative, king François of France, and married to Charles de Coëtivy, Count de Tailleburg, and lived (1462-1520). 

1516-49 Sovereign Duchess Marguerite d'Orléans-Angoulême of Berry 
1525-49 Duchess of Alençon and Rodez, Comtesse d'Armagnac, du Perche, Pezenac, de L'Isle-Jourdain, Porhoët, Pardiac, Viscomtesse Fezenzaguet, Brulhois, d'Auvillars, Baroness de Castelnau, Caussade, Montmiral and Dame de La Flêche and Baugé  
She was sister of Francis I of France, and first married the Duke of Alençon (d.1525) and in 1527, Henry d'Albret (titular king of Navarra). With a strong interest in Renaissance learning, she was much influenced by Erasmus and the religious reformers of the Meaux circle, who looked to her for patronage and  protection. She encouraged agriculture, learning, and the arts, and her court was the most intellectual in Europe. The  patron of men of letters, including the heretical poet Clément Marot, she was a prolific writer of long devotional poems, dramas, secular poems, and the celebrated Heptaméron, a collection of stories on the theme of love. She lived (1492-1549).

1524-... Sovereign Countess Madeleine de la Tour of Auvergne  
Succeeded sister, Countess Anne, and reigned jointly with husband Lorenzo de' Medici. She was succeeded by daughter Catherine de' Medici, Queen of France, but it is not known exactly when. Madeleine (d. 1579).

1529.... Sovereign Baroness Renée de Bourbon-Montpensier of Mercoeur  
The barony was given to her and her husband, Antoine, duc de Lorraine. Her son was made a prince of Mercoeur.

1530-46 Sovereign Duchess Marie de Luxembourg-St. Pôl of Valois  
She was given the title by her relative, king François of France, who was Duke of Valois (1499-1516 and 1517-30). Marie (d. 1546).

1531-... Sovereign Countess Guyonne XVII of Laval  
Daughter of Guy XVI and Charlotte de Aragon. She was originally named Catherine Anne, but took the feminized version of Guy upon her succession. She married Claude de Rieux, and was succeeded by daughter Renée in 1547, who took the name Giyonne XVIII.

1537-60 Sovereign Duchess Adrienne II of Estouteville  
Daughter of Jean III, seigneur d'Estouteville, and married François de Bourbon-Vendome, Duc d'Estouteville and Count of Saint-Pôl, and was succeeded by daughter in 1546. She lived (1512-60).

1537-65 Sovereign Duchess Anne de Pisseleu of Étampes
Created Duchess jointly with husband, Jean de Brosse. She was mistress of King François I.

1539-49 Duchess Marie d'Albert of Nemours  
Daughter of Charlotte de Bourgogne and married Charles de Clèves. She lived (1492-1549). 

1540 Sovereign Princess Anne de Rohan-Caboët of Rohan, Porhoët and León  
Married to Pierre de Fontenay, who became Duke of Rohan after their marriage.  

Circa 1540 -1569 Sovereign Countess Charlotte de Brosse of Penthièvre   
Her son, Sébastien de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl, got the title of Duke of Penthièvre, and was succeeded by daughter in 1579. 

1545-59 Regent Dowager Duchess Christine of Denmark of Lorraine/Lothringen  
1560-90 Titular Queen of Denmark, Sweden and Norway, The Wends, Goths and Slavs, Duchess of Schleswig-Holstein, Ditmasken, Lorraine, Bar and Milano, Countess of Oldenborg and Balomnt, Lady of Tortana
Regent for son Karl II (1545-1608). 1560 She took over the claims as successor of their father, Christian II (d. 1559), from her sister, Countess Palatine Dorothea, who had no children. Christine lived (circa 1521-90).

1546-1601 Sovereign Duchess Marie de Bourbon-Saint-Pôl of Estouteville, Countess de Saint-Pôl  
Also known as Marie de Bourbon-Vendôme, she was daughter of François de Bourbon-Vendôme, Duc d'Estouteville and Count of Saint-Pôl and Chaumont (1491-45) and Adrienne II, Duchesse d'Estouteville (1512-60). Marie succeeded her brother, François (1536-46). She first married Jean de Bourbon-Vendôme, Count de Soissons, then François de Cleves-Nevers, Duke de Nevers, whom she divorced in 1561 and finally with Léonor d'Orléans, Duc de Longueville (d. 1573). Marie lived (1539-1601).

1547-58 Sovereign Duchess Eléonore of Austria of Touraine  
Married to Manoel I of Portugal and then to king François I of France (1497-1547). After his death she was given the duchy as a dowry. He was succeeded as king by his brother Henri II, since their marriage was childless. She lived (1498-1558).

1547-67 Sovereign Countess Guyonne XVIII "la Folle" of Laval  
The daughter of Guyonne VIII, she was origninally named  Renée de Rieux, and succeeded her uncle Count Guy XVI. 1545 she had married Louis de Sainte-Maure, marquis de Nesle et comte de Joigny. She lived a tumultary life and converted to the Calvinist faith. Her sister, Claude de Rieux, married one of the protestant leaders François d'Andelot. She was convicted for traison by the Parliament of Paris together with two other leaders of the "poursuite de Meaux" which tried to kill King Charles IX and Queen-Mother, Catherine de Médici in 1567, their possessions were confiscated, and executed. Guyonne escaped this faith because of her mental instbility. She sought refuge in Laval and diged a few months later. She was succeeded by her sister Clude, or his son Paul, who took the name of Guy XIX he died 1586.

1548-66 Sovereign Duchess Diane de Portiers of Valentinos and d'Étampes  
She was the mistress of King Henri II of France and first married to Louis de Breze, Count de Maulevrier. She hat tree daughters, Francoise de Breze, Countess de Maulevrier, who was married to Robert von der Marck, lord of Sedan, Duc de Bouillon, Louise de Breze, Dame d'Anet, who was married to Claude of Lorraine, Duc d'Aumale, and by Henri II, she had Diane de Valois. She lived (1499-1566).

1549-1601 Sovereign Countess Henriette de March-Nevers of Rethel 
1564-1601 Sovereign Duchess of Nevers (Belgium)
From 1549-64 she was Countess de Rethel and in 1564 she succeeded her brother Jacques, who had succeeded their father, François de March Nevers in 1563. Her husband Ludovico Gonzaga, Duke of Mantova was duke of Nevers-Rethel by the right of his wife. Her father and brother had left her with large debts but she managed to bring the financial situation back in order, and was one of the chief creditors of the kingdom. Her son, Charles II de Gonzauge, had been co-governor with his father of Champagne since 1589 and had become titular duke in 1595 after his father's death, but did not take part in the government until after her death in 1601. 

1550-74 Sovereign Duchess Marguerite de France of Berry  
Daughter of François I of France and Duchess Claude de Bretagne, she was married to Emmanuel-Philibert, duc de Savoie, and lived (1523-74). 

1552-67 HM Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots
1558-87 Titular Duchess of Touraine  
Mary became Queen of Scotland when she was just six days old. At age five she was sent to France to be brought up in the French court, and eventually married King Francis II, who died the next year, where after Mary returned to Scotland where a series of politically unwise love affairs and her continued adherence to Catholicism in a Protestant country led to trouble and a revolt against her. Forced to flee to England for refuge, she now faced the fears of Queen Elizabeth I who saw her as a rival to her throne. Elizabeth kept Mary under a form of imprisonment for the next 19 years. Watched closely, she was implicated in a series of conspiracies against Queen Elizabeth, and was executed. She lived (1552-87).

1556-57 Regent Dowager Princess Françoise de Brézé of Sedan and Bouillon  
Regent after the death of her husband, Robert IV de Sedan, who was also created Duke de Bouillon. She was daughter of Diane de Portier, mistress of the French King. Françoise was also Countess of Maulevrier and had two sisters, Diane de Valois, who was Duchess of Chatellerault etc., and Louise de Brézé, Dame d'Anet. Françoise was mother of 9 children, and died 1557.

1560-63 Regent Dowager Queen Catherine de' Medici of France
1562-89 Sovereign Duchess of Valois, Countess Auvergne and Boulogne
She was Titular Countess of Urbino in Italy 1519-21. In 1533 she married to Henri, Duke of Orleans, who became the French king in 1547. As Queen she was very influential in bringing aspects of Italian culture to France, such as their theater and food. After her husband's death, she gained political power as regent for her sons (she had ten children). An ambitious woman, she actively involved herself in the political intrigues of the court, always trying to increase royal power. At first Catherine tried to reconcile France's opposing Catholic and Protestant factions as their violent disputes threatened national unity. But instead she initiated the massacre in 1570 of Protestants (the massacre of St Bartholomew). Succeeded mother, Madeleine de la Tour, as Countess of Auvergne and father Lorenzo II de Medici as titular Countess of Urbino. She lived (1519-89)

Until 1561 Sovereign Countess Jacqueline-Marguerite de Longwy of Bar-sur-Seine  
She was the first wife of Louis de Bourbon, Duc de Montpensier, Prince de La Roche-sur-Yon and Dauphin d'Auvergne. 

1564-1633 Sovereign Countess Catherine de Clèves-Nevers of Eu and Souveraine de Chateau-Renaud  
Succeeded brother, Jacques de Clèves, and was married to Henri de Lorraine, duc du Guise. She lived (1548-1633)

1565-69 Sovereign Duchess Charlotte de Penthièvre  
Succeeded by daughter, Marie de Penthièvre

Circa 1568-97 Sovereign Marquise Renée d'Anjou of Mézières, Countess de Saint-Fargeau  
Married to François, Prince-Dauphin d'Auvergne, Duc de Montpensier (1582), duc de Saint-Argau (1572) and de Châtellerault (1582/84), who lived (circa 1542-92). She (d. 1597).

1569-1623 Sovereign Princess Marie de Penthièvre of Martigues  
She was created Princess after her father, Sebastien de Luxembourg, Duke de Penthièvre, was killed. She married Philibert-Emmanuel de Lorraine, duc de Meroeur (d. 1602). And their daughter brought Martigues to her husband, Cécar de Bourbon-Vendome, legitimated son of Henri IV. 

1572-1604 Sovereign Duchess Catherine de Navarra of Albert, Comtesse d'Armagnac and Rodez  
She succeeded her mother, Juana III of Navarra, and was also Princess of Navara and "Madame France" through her father, Antoine de Vendome. Sister of King Henri IV of Frace and married to Henri de Lorraine, Duc de Bar, who was succeeded by his daughter by the second marriage, Nicoläa. Cathrine had no children, and lived (1559-1604).

1572-90 Countess Regnant Marguerite de Foix of Candale, d'Astarac et de Bénauges  
After her brother, Henri, was killed at Sommiéres, she inherited her family's possessions. She was married to Jean-Louis de Nogaret de la Valette, Duc d'Epernon (1554-1642), but had no children. She imprisoned her sister, Madame Françoise de Candale (d. 1649), and forced her to become a nun, but after her death Françoise left the convent and started a process in order to gain the family possessions. Marguerite lived (1567-93).

1574-84 Regent Dowager Duchess Françoise de Brézé of Sagan  
She was Countess de Maulevner in her own right. After the death of her husband Henri-Robert de La March, Duke of Sagan and Titular Duke of Bouillon, she was regent for son Guillaume-Robert (1562-88), who was succeeded by sister, Charlotte. Françoise was daughter of King  François and lived (...87).

Until 1574 Marquise Marie de Clèves de l'Isle, Countess de Beaufort   
Daughter of Francois I de Clèves, Duke of Nevers. 1574 she married Henri I de Bourbon, Prince de Conde, Duc d'Enghien, she died during the birth of her daughter, Catherine de Bourbon, Marquise d'Isles (1574-95). Marie lived (1553-74). 

1574-95 Marquise Catherine de Bourbon of de l'Isle, Countess de Beaufort   
Succeeded mother, Marie de Clèves, who died during her birth. Catherine lived (1574-95).

1576-78 Sovereign Duchess Elizabeth d'Austrice of Berry  
She was given the duchy after the death of her husband, King Charles IX (1550-60-74), the son of Henri II and Catherine de' Medici. Their only child was a daughter - Princess Marie-Elisabeth who lived (1572-78) - and Charles therefore was succeeded by his brother Henri III. Elizabeth lived (1554-78).

1579-1623/24 Sovereign Duchess Marie de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl of Penthièvre  
Succeeded father. Her husband, Philippe Emmanuel de Lorraine, was Duke of Penthièvre 1579-1602 by the right of his wife. She was succeeded by daughter, Françoise de Lorraine in 1623 or 1624.

1580-1611 Sovereign Marquise Henriette de Savoie of Villars, Countess of Tende and Sommerive  
She was daughter of Honoré II and Jeanne-François de Foix and married to Charles de Lorraine. Her daughter, Catherine de Lorraine (1585-16189) and her husband, Carlo I Gonzaga, Duke of Mantova, Monferrato, Nevers and Rethel were Duchess and Duke of Mayenne. Henriette lived (1541-1611).  

1581-1604 Sovereign Duchess Claude Catherine de Clermont of Retz   
Originally Dame de Dampierre and Baronne de Retz she was created Duchess-regnant together with her husband. She lived (circa 1543-1604).

1582-1615 Sovereign Duchess Marguerite of Valois, Senlis, Clermont et d'Étampes  
1608-15 Countess of Auvergne et d'Eu
Succeeded mother, Catherine de Medici, in Valois. In 1572 she was forced to marry the Protestant Henri of Navarra (later Henri IV) to seal a Catholic-Protestant reconciliation. She was involved in a number of extramarital love affairs at the courts of both her brother Henri III at Paris and her husband at Nerac. Expelled from the royal court for her political intrigues, she returned to the unwilling Navarre in 1584. After taking up arms against her husband, she was banished to the castle of Usson in Auvergne, where she soon took control. In 1599, ten years after her husband's accession to the throne, she consented to the annulment of her marriage. he was a very important cultural personality, her charm and literary talent were admired by the leading writers of the age and was also known as Reine Magot. She lived (1553-1615).

1582-1619 Sovereign Duchess Diane de Valois of Châtellerault, d'Angoulême et d'Etampes  
Daughter of Diane de Portiers and King Henri II of France, and was legitimized as Princess of France in 1548. She married Orazio Farnese, Duke of Castro and secondly with François Villers-Cotterets, Duke de Montmorency. She lived (1538-1619).

1589-1601 Sovereign Duchess Louise de Lorraine-Vaudémont of Berry  
Widow of Henri III, count of Angoulême (1551), Duke d'Orléans, d'Anjou and Bourbon (1566), King of Poland (1573). Louise lived (1553-1601).

1590-1603 Joint Sovereign Countess Gabrielle of Joigny   
Jointly with Countess Anne.

1590-? Joint Sovereign Countess Anne of Joigny   
Jointly with Countess Gabrielle.

1595-99 Duchess Gabrielle d'Estree of Beaufort and Verneuil, Marquise de Monceaux  
She was the mistress of Henri IV of France, and was active in persuading him to convert from Protestantism to Catholism. She died after having given birth to a still-born child, her third, and lived (1571-99).


1608-56 Sovereign Duchess Henriette Catherine de Joyeuse, Countess du Bouchage and Baroness des Roches  
Succeeded father, and married to Henri de Bourbon, Duc de Montpensier de Châtellerault de Saint-Fargeau and Prince souverain des Dombes etc., who was succeeded by their daughter, Marie de Bourbon. The Duchy of Joyeuse passed trough another line. (1585-1656). 

1608-27 Sovereign Duchess Marie de Bourbon of Montpensier, Châtellerault et de Saint-Fargeau and  Princesse Souveraine des Dombe, Countess de Mortain etc.  
Daughter of Henri de Bourbon, who was killed. She married Gaston of France, who was Duc d'Orléans, Chartres, Valois, d'Alençon, Comte de Blois, de Monthéry et de Limours etc. Succeeded by daughter Anne-Marie and lived (1605-27). 

1610-17 Regent Dowager Queen Marie de' Medici of France
1612-19 Governor of Normandie (Normandy)
1619-39 Countess d'Anjou
Daughter of Francesco de' Medici, grand duke of Toscana and became the second wife of King Henri IV in 1600. After his assassination she became regent for her son Louis XIII. She reversed the policies set by her husband. Having remained in power for three years beyond the king's majority, Marie was forced into exile after the murder of Concini in 1617. In 1619 her partisans rose in revolt, but she was reconciled to her son in 1622. After the rise to power of her former favourite, Cardinal Richelieu, she attempted to regain influence by urging the king to dismiss his minister of state; instead Louis forced his mother into a new exile at Compiègne, whence she fled to the Netherlands in 1631, never to return to France. One of her children was the politically influential Henrietta Maria, Queen of Charles I of England. Marie lived (1573-1642).


1623-26 Regent Princess Dowager Elisabeth van Nassau of Sedan  
Her husband, de La Tour d'Auvergne, Duc de Bouillon tried to keep his small but independent state of Sedan independent from France, but as more and more Huguenots came for refuge, it became a Protestant center within an increasingly hostile Catholic country. After her husband's death, she was regent for son, Frédéric-Maurice (1605-52). She had also acted as regent during her husband's absence and continued to act as temporary regent for son. Two of her sisters were regents in Hanau and The Rhine. She lived (1577-1642).

1623/24-69 Sovereign Duchess Françoise de Lorraine of Mercoeur and Penthièvre  
Daughter of Duchess Marie de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl (1579-1602), and succeeded father, Cécar de Bourbon, Duc de Vendome, the son of Gabrielle d'Estree and Charles II de Lorraine. She married Louis, who was created duke of her possessions after their marriage. She lived (1692-1669). 

1624-57 Sovereign Duchess Nicole of Lorraine  
Also known as Nikolaea or Nicoläa of Lothringen, she was daughter of Heinrich der Gute von Lothringen, who was succeeded by Franz de Vaudemont in 1624, who abdicated after 2 months. Her husband, Karl IV was Duke 1625-34 by the right of his wife - until his abdication. France occupied the Duchy 1633-36 and 1641-75. She lived (1608-57).

Until 1624 Sovereign Duchess Diane de Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl of Piney  
Daughter of Count Charles de Ligny (d. 1608) and Brienne and Marie de Nogaret. Her sister was Louise, Countess de Brienne (1567-1647). 

1637-48 Stadtholder Countess Ursula von Solms-Braunfels of the Principality of Orange  
After the death of her husband, Christoph, Burgrave and Lord zu Donha-Schlobitten, she took over his post governor. She was daughter of Count Johann Albrecht I von Solms-Braunfels in Braunfels and Gambit and Countess Agnes zu Sayn-Wittgenstein. Ursula was succeded by her son, Friedrich (1621-48-60-88). She and lived (1594-1657).

1638-75 Sovereign Duchess Marie Madeleine de Vignerot of Aiguillon  
The niece of the Cardinal Richelieu, as daughter of his sister Françoise (d. 1615) who was René Vignerot, seigneur de Pont-Courlay (d. 1625). She was an renowned cultural personality of her times and her Salon was famous. Succeeded by niece Marie-Thérèse Vignerot, and lived (1604-1675).


1641-94 Sovereign Duchess Claire-Clémence de Maillé-Brézé of Fronsac  
She was daughter of the Marshall of France, Urbain de Maillé, marquis of Brézé, and Nicole du Plessis, who was insane and died in 1635. Claire-Clémence succeeded her uncle , Cardinal Richelieu, Premier Minister of France the same year she married Louis II de Bourbon-Condé, Duke d'Enghien, Prince de Condé (1621-86), but like her mother, she was mentally instable, a condition inherited by her son, Henri Jules de Bourbon-Condé, who married Anne de Baverie, Duchesse de Guise and Joyeuse. Claire-Clémence lived (1628-94).

1643-51 Regent Dowager Queen Anne d'Austrice of France
She was Infanta of Spain and the eldest daughter of Felipe III of Spain, and married Louis XIII, King of France, in 1615.  After some political maneuvering she attained full powers as Regent and as such she placed the well-being of France before anything else. She ignored the representatives of the Catholic party and made Cardinal Mazarin Prime Minister. Both continued the policies laid out by Richelieu, which decided against a peace treaty with Germany and The Netherlands. At one stage, Anne even went to war against her brother, King Felipe IV of Spain, and in negotiations refused to make any compromises. In 1648 the revolution called "the Fronde" began and would last until 1653. This rebellion started in Paris and was supported by the higher nobility as well as by the common people who had had enough of war and the ever increasing taxes. The rebels blamed Mazarin and not only demanded his removal but also wanted him expelled from France. In 1661 Mazarin died and Louis XIV took over control of the country. From then on Anna was given only representative roles. In 1666 she died of cancer, after having lived (1601-66). 

1648-84 Sovereign Duchess Marguerite de Rohan-Frontenay of Rohan, Duchess de Porhoët-León et Soubize et Princesse de León  
In 1645 Louis XIV allowed her to keep her status and dignity of Princess if she married Henri Chabot, Seigneur de Sainte-Aulaye, who was created Duke de Rohan in 1648. Their children got the surname Rohan-Chabot. Succeeded first by son and then by daughter, Anne in 1686. Marguerite lived (1617-84).

1652-74 Sovereign Duchess Marie Jeanne de Savoie-Nemours of Nemours    
1659-1724 Duchess of Aumale
1675-84 Regent Dowager Queen  of Savoia (Italy)
Also known as Marie-Giovanna-Babtiste, she succeeded father, Charles Amédée de Savoie-Nemours of Aumale in Nemours and uncle in Aumale. After the death of her husband Carlo-Emmanuelle II of Savoia, she was regent for son Victor-Amedée of Sardegnia (1666-1732). She lived (1644-1724).

1653-96 Sovereign Duchess Marie Françoise de Valois of Angoulême  
Succeeded father, Louis Emmanuel, because all her brother died before her, except Antoine Charles, who was illegitimate. Her great-grandfather was illegitimate son of Charles IX. Her husband, Louis de Lorraine, Duke de Joyeuse was joint ruler until his death in 1654. She lived (1632-96).

1655-63 Sovereign Duchess Marie de Rohan-Montbazon of Chevereuse  
She bought the duchy from her husband, Claude de Lorraine (1578-1657), and later left it to her grandson by her fist marriage, Charles Honoré d'Albert de Luynes. She (d. 1679).

1658-90 Governor Marie Bonnard du Parquet of Martinique (French External Territory)
After the death of her husband, governor Jacque Dyel de Parquet (1635-46 and 1647-58), she took over as regent for the oldest of their six children, who had been designated as governor by the French king. After an insurrection of the colonists, she left for France but died at sea.

1660-82 Sovereign Duchess Anne-Marie-Louise d'Orléans of Montpensier, Countess d'Eu, Mortain etc.  
As a French Princess she was also called La Grande Mademoiselle. She was daughter of Gaston d’Orlèans, the brother of Louis XIII. She took an active part on the rebel side in the Fronde of the Princes. In 1652 she relived the city of Orlèans at the head of her troops and opened the gates of Paris to Louis II de Bourbon, prince de Condé, and his army. Exiled with her father in 1652, she returned to court in 1657. She fell in love with the duc de Lauzun and got the king’s permission for their marriage - but it was later revoked (1670). Shortly thereafter, Lauzun was imprisoned She bought his release in 1681 and apparently married him, but they soon separated. She spent the rest of her life in pious works and the composition of her memoirs. She lived (1627-93).

1661-1701 Sovereign Duchess Madeleine Charlotte de Clermont-Tonnerre of Piney-Luxembourg, Princesse de Tigny, Countess de Piney and Baroness de Dangu  
Her mother, Marguerite Charlotte de Luxembourg, had been Duchess since 1616 and in 1661 she resigned in favour of her son by the first marriage, Henri León d'Albert de Luxembourg. Later the same year, he resigned in Madeleine's favour in order to become a deacon (known as L'Abbe de Luxembourg). She was born in her mother's second marriage with Charles Henri de Clermont-Tonnerre, and when she married Francois-Henri de Montmorency, who became known as the Duc de Piney-Luxembourg. Luxembourg. Madeleine-Charlotte-Bonne-Thérèse de Clermont "called de Luxembourg" lived (1635-1701).

1661 Claimant to the Duchy of Piney Marie Charlotte de Luxembourg  
She claimed the duchy, upon the resignation of her relative, Henri León d'Albert de Luxembourg, and simultaneously resigned it to her Madeleine and her son-in-law, François-Henri de Montmorency, comte de Luxe (1628-95), whose family used the title of duke of Montmorency-Luxembourg, after a prolonged legal battle, but this peerage was never considered to have been created. 

1661-63 Sovereign Duchess Marie Catherine de La Rochefouchauld-Randan of Randan  
She was heiress of the County of Randan and was created Duchess, with a remainder to her daughter, Marie Claire de Bauffremont-Sennecey and her male children with Jean-Baptiste Gaston de Foix de Candale, Comte de Fleix. They both resigned in 1663 in favour of Marie Claire's son, who was known as duc de Foix. Marie Catherine (d. 1677).

1667-75 Sovereign Duchess Louise-Françoise de La Baume Le Blanc of Vallière  
She was given the duchy in 1667, but eight years later she resigned in favour of her daughter, whose father was King Louis XIV, Marie-Anne de Bourbon, upon entering the Carmelite order as Louise de la Miséricode. She lived (1644-1710). 

1670-73 Politically Active Queen Eleonora Maria Josefa von Habsburg of Poland 
1690-97 Politically Active Dowager Duchess of Lorraine  
Politically active during reign of her first husband, king Michał Korybut Wiśniowieckiof Poland, and in 1673 she prevented the civil war in Poland. After the death of her second husband, Karl IV Leopold, she tried to fulfill the last wishes of her husband by putting all her energy into the return of Lorraine to her children. At the German Reichstag in Regensburg she presented an offer for the restoration of Lorraine and established the rights of her eldest son, Leopold Joseph. In 1697 at the Treaty of Rijswijk she achieved her aims, but died only a few weeks after. Mother of 5 children with second husband, and lived (1653-97).

1675-96 Sovereign Duchess Elisabeth d'Orléans of Alençon and d'Angoulême  
Daughter of Gaston, Duc d'Orléans, and lived (1646-1696).

1675-88 Sovereign Duchess Marie de Lorraine of Guise et de Joyeuse  
Daughter of Henriette-Catherine de Joyeuse, she succeeded grand-nephew. In 1686 she left Guise and Joinville to Charles de Stainville, Comte de Couvonges, with a remainder to the younger sons of the duke of  Lorraine's younger sons and their heirs male. She also left Joyeuse by an act of 1688 to Charles Francois de Lorraine, prince de Commercy.) The donation of 1686 was voided by the Parlement de Paris in 1689, and Anna Henrietta Julia of Bavaria, second daughter of the prince Palatine, distant cousin of the deceased, inherited Guise and Joinville. Marie de Lorraine lived (1615-1688).
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1675-1704 Sovereign Duchess Marie Madeleine Thérèse de Vignerot of Aiguillon, Demoiselle d'Agénois et Baronne de Saujon  
She succeeded aunt, Marie-Madeleine Vignerot. She became a nun, and at her death the title was inherited by her nephew Louis-Armand, marquis de Richelieu. Marie-Thérèse lived (1635-1705).

1675-98 Sovereign Duchess Marie-Anne de Bourbon of Vallière  
Her mother, Louise-Françoise de La Baume Le Blanc, resigned in her favour. In 1698 she gave the duchy to her cousin, Charles-François de La Baume Le Blanc. She had no children in her marriage with Prince Louis-Armand I de Bourbon-Conti, prince de la Roche-sur-Yon (1661-85). Also known as Marie-Anne de Blois, she was daughter of King Louis XIV, and lived (1666-1739).

1686-1709 Sovereign Duchess Anne de Rohan-Chabot of Rohan-Porhoët and León  
Daughter of Marguerite de Rohan-Frontenay, sovereign Duchess of Rohan from 1638, and Henri Chabot, who was created Duke of Rohan in 1648. Married to François de Soubise. 

1686-1715 Politically influential Marchioness Françoise de Maintenon in France
In 1652 Françoise d'Aubigne married Scarron and entered the Literary Salons of Paris. In 1669 she became governess to the children of Louis XIV by Madame de Montespan, much to the dissatisfaction of the king, who did not like the extreme gravity and reserve of the young widow. Françoise's talents and wisdom soon attracted Louis' attention, and she became his confidant and adviser, and was made a marchioness. She refused to become his mistress, and in 1686 she married Louis to the "left hand", and exercised a disastrous influence on him, encouraging a reactionary politics. She lived (1635-1719).

1689-1723 Sovereign Duchess Anna Henrietta Julia de Bavière of Guise and Joinville  
She succeeded a distant cousin, Marie de Lorraine, who by an act of 1686 had left Guise and Joinville to Charles de Stainville, comte de Couvonges, but this donation was voided by the Parlement de Paris in 1689, and Anna Henrietta Julia , second daughter of the prince Palatine, succeeded to the title. She was married to prince Henri-Jules de Bourbon-Condé, and the duchy was raised to the peerage again for them and their descendants in 1704. Anne Henriette Julie von Bayern was member of the Pfalz-Simmeren-sideline, and father became Kurfürst of Bavaria. She lived (1648-1723).   

1692-1719 Politically Influential Princess Anne Louise Bénédicte de Bourbon-Condé in France
She was married to the Duke of Maine, the natural son of Louis XVI. She was both intelligent and energetic, and she was very influential at court. She took part of the conspiracies in 1718 organized by the Cardinal of Polignac against the Regent with the aim of placing Philippe V of Spain on the throne of France and the Duc du Maine regent in his absence. (1676-1753).

1698-1720 Sovereign Duchess Marie Anne de Bourbon-Condé Conti of Bourbon  
She was daughter of François-Louis de Condé, Duke of Conti and Marie-Therese de Bourbon-Conti. She was fourth in line for the Stuart-throne of England and Scotland. Maria Anna lived (1666-1732).

1705-48 Sovereign Duchesse Elisabeth de Lorraine-Lillebonne of Luxembourg-Saint-Pôl  
Princess Elisabeth d'Epinoy bought the Duchy in 1705. After her death it passed to her son and after his death in 1724 to his sister, The Princesse de Soubise.      

1729... Regent Duchess Elisabeth Charlotte d'Orléans of Lorraine  
1737- 44 Sovereign Princess of Commercy
The Madame Royale was born as Princess of France, Mademoiselle de Chartres and married Leopold Joseph, Duke of Lorraine (1679-1729). Gave birth to at least 13 children most of whom died within a few weeks. Later she was created Duchess de Commercy and after her death the duchy her brother-in-law, Stanislav. She lived (1676-1744).

1734-63 Hereditary Countess Marie Anne Victoria de Soissons of Soissons  
After the death of her nephew, Eugene François de Soisson, Duke of Troppau (1714-29-34), she became heiress to the county. Married to Duke Joseph of Sachsen-Hildburghausen until their divorce in 1752. She lived (1683-1763).


1745-90 Politically influential Marquise Jeanne Antoinette Poisson Le Normant d'Étioles de Pompadour in France      
Madame de Pompadour was the mistress of King Louis XV of France for about 5 years after 1745, and remained his confidante until her death. Of middle-class origin, she owed her success mainly to her intelligence and capabilities. She urged the appointment of the duc de Choiseul and other ministers and encouraged the French alliance with Austria, which involved France in the Seven Years War. She favoured Voltaire and other writers of the Encyclopédie. She employed many artists to decorate her residences, and encouraged the manufacture of Sèvres ware. She lived (1721-64).

1767 Countess Marie Leszczynska of Lorraine  
The daughter of Stanislas Leszczynski (1677-1766), who was placed on the throne of Poland by Karl XII of Sweden who gained this territory in a military campaign in 1704. Stanislas was deposed in 1709, and left the country to settle in the French province of Lorraine and bar. At the age of 23 she was chosen to be the wife of the 16 year old Louis XV. Marie was a very quiet, gentle, and extremely religious person who fulfilled her obligation by having ten children, and provided an heir to the throne. In 1733 Louis took his first mistress. In 1737 Maria had her tenth and last child, and from that time onward, Louis treated his wife with frigid courtesy, never speaking to her except when others were present. She held her own court in her chambers, receiving guests and carrying out ceremonial function and did not become involved in court intrigues and lived a quiet, peaceful existence. She lived (1703-68). 

1769-74 Politically Influential Countess Jeanne du Barry in France 
Her unpopularity contributed to the decline of the prestige of the crown in the early 1770s. She was born Marie-Jeanne Bécu, the illegitimate daughter of lower-class parents. After a convent education, she was a shop assistant in a fashion house in Paris. While there she became the mistress of Jean du Barry, who introduced her into Parisian high society, and her beauty captivated a succession of nobly born lovers before she attracted Louis XV's attention in 1768. Du Barry arranged a nominal marriage between Jeanne and his brother, Guillaume du Barry, and in April 1769 she joined Louis XV's court. She immediately joined the faction that brought about the downfall of Louis XV's minister of foreign affairs, the Duke de Choiseul, in 1770; and she then supported the drastic judicial reforms instituted by her friend the chancellor René-Nicolas de Maupeou, in 1771. On the accession of Louis XVI, Madame du Barry was banished to a nunnery; from 1776 until the outbreak of the Revolution she lived on her estates with the Duke de Brissac. In 1792 she made several trips to London, probably to give financial aid to French émigrés. Condemned as a counter-revolutionary by the Revolutionary Tribunal of Paris in December 1793, she was guillotined, and lived (1743-93).

1774-92 Politically Influential Queen Marie-Antoniette von Habsburg-Lorraine of France
Very influential during the reign of her husband, Louis XVI (1774-92), and her very autocratic opinions and luxurious life-style was a contributing factor the to the French Revolution during which both her husband, son and herself was executed. She lived (1755-93).


1804  Chief Air Minister of Ballooning 
1814-19 Official Aeronaut of the Restoration Madeléine-Sophie Blanchard, France
She was the most famous female aeronaut of her day, became the star of France, and was a favourite of Napoleon Bonaparte. She carried on the tradition of her husband Jean-Pierre, who passed on in 1809. She was killed when her hydrogen balloon caught fire as she watched a fireworks display. She was the first woman to lose her life while flying, and lived (1778-1819).


1810 Regent Queen Hortense de Beauharnais of The Netherlands
1813-37 Titular Duchess of Saint-Leu
In 1810 her husband, Louis Bonaparte abdicated as king in favour of their second surviving son, Napoleon Louis (b. 1804) after four years on the throne, and appointed her as regent, before going into exile. The following year she gave birth to a fourth son who was put in the care of his paternal grandmother, Madame de Souza. After Napoleon I's surrender, she received the title of Duchesse de Saint-Leu, and lost the rank of Queen. Her husband only received the title of Count de Saint-Leu. In 1814 she and Louis Napoleon were divorced. Her third son Louis Napoleon was later first elected President and then became emperor Napoleon III of France. Hortense was daughter of Vicomte Alexander de Beauharnais and the later Empress Joséphine (see below), and she spend the years from five to 10 on Martinique when her parents separated. She lived (1783-1837).

1810-14 Titular Duchess Joséphine de Beauharnais of Navarre  
After her divorce from Napoleon I Bonaparte, she was given the title of Duchess de Navarre after a castle in Normandy. Born as Marie-Josephe-Rose Tascher de la Pagerie at Martinique, she lived (1763-1814).


1812-13 Regent Empress Marie-Louise von Habsburg-Lothringen of France
1814-47 Sovereign Duchess of Parma e Piacenza and Gaustalla (Italy)
Regent during her husband, Napoleon Is war in Russia. After Napoleon's abdication she and her son, Napoleon Francis Joseph Charles Bonaparte (King of Rome and later Duke of Reichstadt), fled Paris to Blois and then to Vienna where she remained until granted the duchies in Italy by her family. In 1821, four months after Napoleon's death, she married, morganatically, her lover, Count Adam-Adalbert von Neipperg (1775-1829). They alreadyhad two children Albertine (1817-67) and Wilhelm Albrecht, Count and later Prince of Montenuovo (1819-95) and in 1822 they had Mathilde. In 1834 Marie-Louise married her grand chamberlain, Charles-René, Count of Bombelles (1785-1856). She was born Marie Louise Leopoldine Franziska Theresia Josepha Lucia, Princess Imperial and Archduchess of Austria, Princess Royal of Hungary and Bohemia as the daughter of Emperor Franz I of Austria and his second wife, Maria Theresa of the Two Sicilies, and lived (1791-1847).

1832 Coup Leader Duchess Marie Caroline Ferdinande Louise de Borbone de Berry in France
She went into exile from France after the overthrow of King Charles X, her father-in-law. Returning secretly in 1832, she organized a small, unsuccessful uprising in an attempt to win the throne her son Henri, later known as the comte de Chambord, who was born almost eight months after the assassination of her husband, the French prince, Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry. For these activities she was imprisoned. However, when it became obvious that the Duchesse was pregnant, she was forced to reveal her secret second marriage to an Italian count. This marriage alienated her royalist supporters, and the French government released her from prison, but she was sent into exile again. She was daughter of Francisco I of the Two Sicilies, and lived (1798-1870).

1859, 1864 and 1870 Regent Empress Eugènie de Guzman Lopez de Zuñiga Royas y Kirkpatric of France
She was regent during her husband, Emperor Napoleon III Bonapartes' warfares against Prussia. Her full name was Eugenia-Maria Ignacia Augustina de Guzman Lopez de Zuñiga Royas y Kirkpatric, 10th Condesa de Moya de Ardalesy de Osera, Condesa de Teba, Abitas, Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Vizcondesa de la Calzada etc. Her sister, Doña Paca, was 9th Condesa de Montijo, 11th Condesa de Penarañda etc. They succeeded their father, Don Cipriano de Guzman Lopez de Zuñiga Royas y Leiva, in 1839. Their mother was the American Mary Kirkpatrick. Empress Eugenie's son died young and her titles were inherited by her sister's children and the present holder of these and many other titles are the 18th Duquesa de Alba. Eugenie's husband was President of France (1848-52) and Emperor (1852-70). She lived (1825-1920).

1991-92 Premier Minister Edith Cresson, France
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, External 1981-83, Trade 1983-84, Industry 1984-86, European Affairs 1988-90. She was European Union Commissioner for Science, Research, Education and Youth 1995-99. In march 1999 she brought along the downfall of the EU-Commission as she refused the step down after a rapport had demonstrated that she was responsible of nepotism and mismanagement. (b. 1934-)


 

Last update 06.09.06